Victoria Square Quilt Block Pattern

Victoria Square quilt block

Victoria Square quilt block

The Victoria Square quilt block pattern is a stunner – it reminds me of green parks and pinwheel whirls.  There is a Victoria Square in Birmingham, but it’s more statues and steps rather than greenery.  The block is classified as a nine patch and I have made it here as an 18″ square.

Cutting requirements for the Victoria Square quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  four light green, four dark green, eight white

3.7/8″ squares:  six each in light green and white, four each in dark green and white




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in both light green and white and in dark green and white.  Place a white square right sides together with a green square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ square either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This makes two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the green and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Central area

Central area

Make the Victoria Square quilt block central area

I’ve shown the layout in two stages.  The first section uses dark green and white only.  Place four dark green/white half square triangles in the middle to form a pinwheel.  On each edge of the pinwheel place a green and a white 3.1/2″ square.  In each case place the green square so that it touches the green triangle of the pinwheel.

In each corner place a dark green/white half square triangle.  Check the photo to be sure that you have the triangles placed correctly.

Victoria Square quilt block complete layout

Victoria Square quilt block complete layout

Complete the layout

Make the outer layer of this quilt block with only light green and white.  The pieces follow a pattern if you begin in the top left corner and follow the frame of the block around in a clockwise direction.

Across the top you have a light green triangle, green square, two light green triangles and a white square.  These form an upside down mountain first, then a larger white triangle pointing outwards and then a white square and white triangle next to each other.

The top right corner is a green/white half square triangle and then the other pieces follow in the same pattern down the right hand side of the block.  The same happens across the bottom of the block (working from right to left) and then again up the left hand side.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the Victoria Square quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt designs

I have shown first the basic quilt design with sixteen blocks arranged in four rows of four.  I’m not too keen on this as you lose the whirligig shape of the block design.

Alternate Victoria Square quilt design

Alternate Victoria Square quilt design

As an alternative I tried several different colours as well as the greens and was very pleased with this design.  You could either use a distinct pattern as I have done, or you could make every block a different colour as a scrappy quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Tulip Tile Medallion Quilt Pattern

Tulip tile medallion quilt

Tulip tile medallion quilt

I’ve used the Tulip Tile quilt block to make a medallion in the middle of this pretty summery quilt pattern.  The quilt measures 48″ square and I have used 1 yard each of white and green fabrics with 3/4 yard of pink, 1/2 yard of batik and 1/4 yard of dark purple fabric.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  I am also holding a belated sale – I normally hold this particular one in May, but didn’t have time last month.  So you can get 16% off all purchases over £5.  No coupon required – the discount will be taken automatically at the checkout.




Completed tulip tile medallion

Completed tulip tile medallion

Cutting requirements for the tulip tile medallion quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  for the tulip tile quilt medallion you will need twenty four purple, twenty four white, four pink and two green.  For the tulip frame you will need twenty four pink, twenty four batik squares.

3.7/8″ squares:  for the tulip tile quilt medallion you will need one each in pink and white, one each in batik and white, one each in pink and batik, two each in pink and green.  For the tulip frame you will need twenty four each in pink and white.

Cut seven 3.1/2″ strips of green fabric across the width of fabric for the two green frames.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use all the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Strip piece the squares

Strip piece the tiles

Strip piece the tiles

The quickest way to make the tiles around the central tulip is by using strip piecing.  Sew together a 3.1/2″ strip each of purple and white.  Cut this panel at 3.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you rectangles 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ which are pairs of squares.  Using these speeds up the piecing of the central section.

First four rows

First four rows

Make the tulip tile quilt block

This block is made with eight rows of eight squares.  I’ve shown them four rows at a time.

Rows one and two are made with four pairs of purple/white squares.  The first row begins with a purple square while the second row begins with a white square.  In row three there’s a pair of purple/white square at each end.  In the middle there are two pink/white and two batik/white half square triangle units.  The fourth row also has a pair of purple/white squares at each end, but there are two pink squares and two pink/batik half square triangles in the middle of the row.

Second half of block

Second half of block

In the second half of the block rows five and six each have a pair of purple/white squares at each end.  Row five contains two pink squares and two pink/green half square triangles in the middle.  Place two green squares and two pink/green half square triangles in the middle of row six.

Lay four pairs of purple/white squares in both row seven and row eight.  Row seven begins with purple while row eight begins with white.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the tulip tile medallion quilt block.  This measures 24.1/2″ square.

Add the first frame

Add the first frame

Add the first frame

Cut 3.1/2″ strips of green fabric for this first frame.  You’ll need two lengths of 24.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 30.1/2″ for the sides.  The medallion now measures 30.1/2″ square.

Make the mini tulips

Mini tulip blocks

Mini tulip blocks

For the next frame I have chosen to use mini tulip blocks.  These are what I normally refer to as rosebud shapes, but for today I’m calling them tulip shapes!

Place two pink/white half square triangles diagonally opposite each other with the pink triangles touching at the middle to form a butterfly shape.  On the other diagonal place a pink square and a batik square.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  This four patch block now measures 6.1/2″ square.  Make twenty four of these.

Sew together rows of tulips

Sew together rows of tulips

Add the tulip frame

Sew the tulip blocks together in two rows of five blocks and two rows of seven blocks.  You can choose which way you’d like to sew them together.  I have chosen to have all the tulips facing in the same direction.  They form a circuit around the medallion block.

I toyed with the idea of alternating the blocks to make zig zag shapes, but it didn’t look right to me because there are an odd number of blocks along each edge.

Sew the two rows of five blocks to the top and bottom of the quilt.  Then sew the two rows of seven blocks to the sides.  The quilt now measures 42.1/2″ square.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the tulip tile medallion quilt border

Lastly for the final border I have used the same 3.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the tulip tile medallion quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Quilting fabrics

Quilting fabrics

I mentioned my fabric sale at the top of the page.  Just to repeat myself – I’m offering a discount of 16% on all sales over £5.  Click here to take a look at my quilting shop.

Rocky Mountain Puzzle Quilt Block Pattern

Rocky mountain puzzle quilt block

Rocky mountain puzzle quilt block

The Rocky Mountain Puzzle quilt block pattern reminds me of several blocks such as the Jacobs Ladder block, but I do like the white square in the middle.  You could use it to add a little colour to the block if you wanted to make it for a scrappy quilt.  It’s a four patch block and I have made it here as a 12″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the rocky mountain quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  three white

3.7/8″ squares:  five white, five brown

3.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles:  two brown

6.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles:  two brown




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares for this.  Place a brown and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This gives you two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Rocky mountain puzzle quilt block layout

Rocky mountain puzzle quilt block layout

Make the rocky mountain puzzle quilt block

Lay the squares out as shown.  Place a white square in the middle and in two diagonally opposite corners.  Place the small brown rectangles above and below the central square, with the longer rectangles on the sides.

The half square triangles are rather more easy to place than sometimes.  On the left hand side and across the top place five half square triangles with the brown triangle always in the bottom right.  For the left hand side and the bottom place five half square triangles with the brown triangle always in the top left.  I sometimes struggle with getting the triangle placements correct so it pleased me that these are so easy to place.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Assemble the block

First sew the rectangles to the top and bottom of the central square.  Then add the rectangles to the sides.  Sew the pairs of half square triangles together above and below the central square.  Then sew the square and three half square triangles together in a column on each side of the block.

Finally sew the three columns to each other to complete the quilt block.

Quilt design ideas

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

For the basic quilt idea I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.

I think that I would probably make this with more colours – maybe in the central square – to give the quilt a bit more interest.

Quilt with alternate blocks rotated

Quilt with alternate blocks rotated

As an alternative design, I have shown the same quilt but with alternate blocks rotated to create a little more for the eye to look at.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Log Cabin Cross Quilt Pattern

Log cabin cross quilt

Log cabin cross quilt

In the log cabin cross quilt I have used log cabin blocks along with stripey blocks which are made using the same fabrics in the same widths.  Just to mix things up a little, I’ve used different widths of logs.  I have also shaded one colour from dark to light and the other from light to dark.  That’s what I love about log cabin quilts – they are so simple and there are so many ways that you can vary the basic pattern.

The quilt measures 52″ by 76″.  I have used 1 yard each of light green and light purple, 3/4 yard each of dark green, medium purple and white, 1/2 yard each of medium green and dark purple.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed log cabin block

Completed log cabin block

Cutting requirements for the log cabin cross quilt

White:  twelve 3.1/2″ squares

Dark purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ strips

Medium purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ strips

Light purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ strips

Dark green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ strips

Medium green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″

Light green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips

For the alternate blocks you will need to cut four strips of each fabric in the widths they are used in the log cabins.  That’s 2.1/2″ in the purples, 1.1/2″ in the greens and 3.1/2″ in white

The final border is made using six 2.1/2″ strips of light green cut across the width of fabric.

First round of logs

First round of logs

Make the log cabin block first round

Use a 3.1/2″ white square for the central square.  This actually won’t finish up in the middle of the block because the logs are different widths, but it’s the starting point of the block.

Beneath that sew a 3.1/2″ dark purple strip.  On the right place a 5.1/2″ dark purple strip.  Across the top place a 5.1/2″ light green strip, followed by a 6.1/2″ light green strip on the left.

As you can see, the logs are all being sewn to the square in an anti-clockwise direction.  In other log cabins they may be sewn clockwise, but the important thing is to stick to one direction for each round of logs.

Second round of logs

Second round of logs

Second round of logs

Use the medium purple and green in this round.  Begin with the 6.1/2″ medium purple. Follow this with the 8.1/2″ medium purple.  Sew the 8.1/2″ medium green across the top.  Finish with the 9.1/2″ medium green on the left side.

Incidentally, you need to press this block at all stages, before you add another log.  Doing this increases the accuracy of the seams.  Always press the seam allowances away from the central square.

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Finally, make the third round of logs with the light purple and dark green strips.

Each block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage.  Make twelve of them.

The alternate blocks

Make panels of strips

Make panels of strips

I had intended to make the stripey blocks as individual blocks.  Then I realised that this would be an enormous waste of time, so I am using the striped sections in panels.

Make the panels using all the fabrics cut in the same widths as they are used in the log cabin blocks.  So that’s 2.1/2″ strips of purple, 1.1/2″ strips of green and a 3.1/2″ white strip.

Assemble the log cabin cross quilt

Make row 1 with a 24.1/2″ striped panel.  Place this with the purple at the top as shown in the photo above.

Rows 2 and 4

Rows 2 and 4

In rows 2 and 4, place two log cabin blocks so that the dark green runs across the top of the pair.

Rows 3 and 5

Rows 3 and 5

Rotate the blocks for rows 3 and 5 so that the dark green runs across the bottom of the pair of blocks.

Finally for row 6 place a 24.1/2″ striped panel.  This time place the green at the top of the panel.

Sew the pairs of log cabin blocks together and then sew the rows to each other.

The sides of the quilt

The sides of the quilt

The sides of the quilt

For the sides of the quilt make up two 48.1/2″ lengths of the striped panel.  Sew a log cabin block to each end of these panels.  In the photo the middle section is folded up purely so that I can show you the blocks at each end.  Rotate the log cabin blocks so that the dark green forms the outer corners of the quilt.

Sew one panel to each side of the quilt.  The panel shown forms the right hand side of the quilt.  Place the other panel the other way up for the left hand side of the quilt.  That way you keep the dark green on the outside of the quilt.

Quilt border

Quilt border

Add the quilt border

Finally make up four 2.1/2″ strips of light green for the border.  Two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the log cabin cross quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Cushions for labels

Cushions for labels

I mentioned recently that I had been to a National Trust property called Packwood House.  I didn’t have the space at the time to show you a really neat idea that they used for labels.  Usually you see printed labels on stands as you move around these properties.  However at this property they had the information printed on cushions.  I thought that was a lovely touch!

Bargello chairs

Bargello chairs

They also had some gorgeous chairs which were very similar to the Bargello chairs on display in Florence – only in much brighter colours.

It was a real treat to see them as well as some tapestries that were centuries old.

 

Flying Dutchman Quilt Block Pattern

Flying Dutchman quilt block

Flying Dutchman quilt block

The Flying Dutchman quilt block is an easy quilt block.  Whenever I use yellow fabric I always wonder I don’t use it more often as it’s such a bright and happy looking colour.  It’s classified as a four patch and I have made it here as a 12″ square.

Cutting requirements for the Flying Dutchman quilt block

3,1.2″ squares:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in yellow and white, two each in yellow and brown




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place a white square right sides together with either a yellow or a brown square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This gives you two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances away from the white and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Central area of the block

Central area of the block

Make the Flying Dutchman quilt block

For the central area of the block, make a four patch unit using the yellow/brown half square triangles.  Place these so that the brown triangles are on the outside across one diagonal and the yellow triangles are on the outside in the other diagonal.

The brown triangles in the middle form a butterfly shape, as do the two yellow triangles.

Full layout

Full layout

For the outer frame of this block place a yellow/white half square triangle in each corner with the white on the outside to form the corners of the block.  Around two corners place a yellow/white half square triangle on each side.  Place white squares around the other two corners.  On each edge of the block there are one white square and one yellow/white half square triangle between the two corners.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Flying Dutchman quilt ideas

For the basic quilt design I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.

Alternate blocks rotated

Alternate blocks rotated

I think that a more interesting design is obtained when some of the blocks are rotated.

I rather like the way the brown seems to form circles.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

Havana Cathedral Quilt – Free Pattern

Havana Cathedral quilt

Havana Cathedral quilt

The Havana Cathedral quilt is based on a gorgeous stained glass window that I saw in the Cathedral when I was in Cuba recently.  I had intended to make a wall hanging, but somehow I’ve ended up with a queen size quilt pattern!  Each block is easy to make and they are big blocks so the quilt goes together quite quickly.  It’s also rectangular and would fit a queen size bed, so it ticks a lot of boxes.

The original stained glass window

The original stained glass window

Within the quilt I have used three blocks which are 18″ by 24″ finished size and six blocks which are 24″ squares.  The fabric requirements are 2 yards each of dark blue and red, 1.3/4 yards of light blue, 3/4 yard of white and 1/2 yard of medium blue.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the Havana Cathedral quilt

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

12.7/8″ squares:  twelve light blue, six red, six dark blue

4.3/4″ squares:  twelve medium blue

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve dark blue, twelve white

3.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in dark blue and red, twelve each in light blue and red, six each in red and white.  These are for the half square triangles.  In addition you will need six dark blue, six white and twelve red squares for the diamond in a square blocks.

For the borders you will need to cut seven strips across the width of fabric in each of 2.1/2″ red, 1.1/2″ white and 2.1/2″ dark blue.

Make half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

You need to make half square triangles with some, but not all of the 3.7/8″ squares.  Use those squares listed in pairs above.

Place a red square right sides together  with either a light blue or a dark blue square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line. Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Place triangles around the square

Place triangles around the square

Make diamond in square units

Cut the remaining 3.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square (shown in the top right of the photo).

Lay down a 4.3/4″ medium blue square and place a dark blue and a white triangle on two opposite edges, with two red triangles on the other two opposite edge.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Sew the dark blue and white triangles to the edges of the square first.

Press them open and then sew the two red triangles to the square.  When you press these open you’ll see that you have created a square with a medium blue diamond in the middle.  Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.  This is now a 6.1/2″ square.

Top half of the block

Top half of the block

Make the Havana Cathedral quilt block

This block is made of eight rows of six squares each – that’s counting the diamond in square units as equivalent to four squares.

I’ve shown the top four rows first.  In each corner place a dark blue square with a dark blue/red half square triangle beneath it.  In the middle place two diamond in a square units.  Lay them with the red triangles in the top middle to create a larger red triangle pointing downwards.

The third and fourth rows are made with dark blue/red half square triangles at each end and a light blue/red half square triangle inside them.  In the third row there are two white squares in the middle.   For the fourth row place two red/white half square triangles in the middle.

Lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

The lower half of the block is very similar.  Rows five and six are almost the same as rows three and four.  Just check which way to place the half square triangles.

Rows seven and eight are almost the same as rows one and two.  Again it is just the direction of the triangles that has changed.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across each row.  You need to make a double row at the top and bottom of the block.

Sew the dark blue square and red/dark blue half square triangles together first.  Then you can sew them to the diamond in a square units.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″ at the moment.  You need to make three of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the alternate block

This is a huge block, but I felt that it gave the right feel to the surrounding area of the Havana Cathedral blocks.  It’s also dead easy to make!

Use the 12.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units. Use exactly the same method as above for the smaller half square triangle units.

Place two red/light blue half square triangles with two red/dark blue half square triangles as shown.  This makes one large red triangle, one large dark blue triangle and two large light blue triangles.  Sew them together in pairs and then sew the pairs together to create the block.  This is now a 24.1/2″ square and you need to make six of them.

As an aside, I had originally intended to make these blocks 18″ by 24″, same as the other blocks.  However the triangles were very odd sizes for this, so I opted for simplicity and made the blocks as  squares instead.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assemble the Havana Cathedral quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Place the Havana Cathedral block in the middle of each row.

In rows 1 and 3 place the alternate blocks on either side with the dark blue triangle on the inside.

Row 2

Row 2

For row 2 the alternate blocks are rotated so that the light blue triangles lie on the inside.

On the left hand side the red triangle lies at the top while on the right hand side the blue triangle lies at the top.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt border

I’ve used three borders to frame the quilt.  Make the first border with 2.1/2″ red strips.  Cut two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 76.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made with 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  Two lengths of 70,1.2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally make the third border with 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  Two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 82.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Havana Cathedral quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Iris flowers

Iris flowers

One of the colour combinations that I love in quilts is purple and green.  Yesterday I visited a National Trust property with a wonderful garden.  These iris flowers were a gorgeous deep purple – just as beautiful as the fantastic William Morris designs within the property.

Wightwick Manor

Wightwick Manor

The house itself was Wightwick Manor which is a celebration of the Arts and Crafts Movement – absolutely beautiful both inside and outside.

 

Clown Quilt Block – Free Pattern

Clown quilt block

Clown quilt block

The clown quilt block portrays the pink and white type of design that I remember clowns wearing in my childhood.  These days they seem to wear bright jacket and trousers outfits, but this quilt block brought back some happy memories for me.

This block is classified as a five patch block and I have made it here as a 20″ square.

Cutting requirements for the clown quilt block

4.1/2″ squares:  fourteen white

5.1/4″ squares:  six white, six pink




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 5.1/4″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a pink and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4.7.8″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the pink and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

Make these into quarter square triangles

Now take two of the half square triangles and place them right sides together.  Make sure that the seam is running in the same direction in both these squares, and that the pink triangle is top left on the bottom square but the white triangle is top left on the top square.

Mark a line along the diagonal running from top right to bottom left.  This runs across the first seam line, not in line with it.  Sew a 1/4″ square either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two quarter square triangle units which are now 4.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances and trim the two tips where fabric sticks out.

Clown quilt block layout

Clown quilt block layout

Make the clown quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out in five rows of five.  Rows one and five are made with three quarter square triangle units and two white squares alternating across the row.  The egg timer shape lies vertically in the middle square but horizontally in the squares at each end of the row.

Rows two and four contain three squares and two quarter square triangles alternating across the row.  All the egg timer shapes lie vertically in these two rows.

Finally in row three, the middle row, there are four white squares with just the one quarter square triangle in the middle of the row.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the clown quilt block.

Basic clown quilt image

Basic clown quilt image

For the basic quilt suggestion, I have shown sixteen blocks laid out in four rows of four.  Quite an interesting quilt and there is definitely plenty of open space for some decorative quilting.

Quilt with some blocks rotated

Quilt with some blocks rotated

As an alternate quilt idea, I tried rotating some of the blocks.  This gives a very different quilt, and I can even see some pinwheels forming in four places within the quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

Bright Jewel Quilt – Free Pattern

Bright jewel quilt

Bright jewel quilt

I’ve made the Bright Jewel quilt using my variation on the quilt block of that name, together with an alternative block using more red to create that red diamond frame around the middle.

The quilt measures 49″ square and I have used 1 yard of red, 3/4 yard each of light blue and white, 1/2 yard of medium blue (turquoise actually) and 1/4 yard of dark blue fabric.  I have used nine blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the bright jewel quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty two white, seventeen red

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty six each in turquoise and white, eighteen each in red and dark blue

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six light blue

For the border you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of red across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Make the four patch units

Make the four patch units

Make the four patch units

There are four 4-patch units in each block.  Place a red/dark blue half square triangle diagonally opposite a white square.  Add two turquoise/white half square triangles diagonally opposite each other.

Note that the red triangle is on the outside of the four patch unit and the two turquoise triangles are also on the outside.  The white square with two white triangles forms a rosebud shape.   Make twenty of these for the bright jewel quilt block and eight more for the alternate block.

Bright jewel quilt block layout

Bright jewel quilt block layout

Make the bright jewel quilt block

Place a four patch unit in each corner of the block.  Rotate them so that the red triangle is always on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Lay a light blue rectangle between each pair of four patch units with a red square in the middle of the block.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together within each four patch unit first.  Then sew the pieces together across each of the three rows.  Finally sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

The block is now 15.1/2″ square and you need to make five.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Make the alternate block

The alternate block is almost the same as the first block.  I have made one change only and that is to exchange two of the white squares for red squares.

Basically two of the four patch units are the same as for the bright jewel block and two of them have a red square instead of a white square.

Sew the squares together in the same way as above.  The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place a bright jewel block at each end with an alternate block in the middle.

Place the alternate block so that the extra red squares are towards the bottom of the block.

Row two

Row two

In row two the alternate blocks are at each end with a jewel block in the middle.

Notice that the extra red squares are towards the right of the first block and towards the left of the third block.

Row three

Row three

For row three the blocks are placed so that there’s an alternate block in the middle with a jewel block on either side of it.  This time the extra red squares are towards the top of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Use 2.1/2″ strips of red for the border.  I did this so that the border would blend into the red triangles around the edges.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the bright jewel quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Revolution square, Havana

Revolution square, Havana

As you may know, I went on my travels again last week.  My daughter and I went to Cuba.  We stayed a few days in Havana and a few days on Varadero by the beach.  We had the most wonderful time.  Havana was absolutely fascinating.  Samantha has an app on her phone that could tell her how far she walked.  Apparently on the first day we walked over 14 km.  No wonder we felt exhausted.

Havana Cathedral

Havana Cathedral

The Cathedral was truly beautiful and I found several quilt ideas in there – the stained glass windows were very unusual.

In Varadero the sea was so warm that it was a real pleasure to go swimming and snorkelling every day – such a change from the rather chilly waters around the UK!

Cobwebs Quilt Block Pattern

Cobwebs quilt block

Cobwebs quilt block

The Cobwebs quilt block is an unusual but easy to make quilt block.  I’ve made it here as a 9″ square finished size.  Although I’ve used brown and yellow only here, this block would also be a useful one for using up scrap fabrics.

Cutting requirements for the cobwebs quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  two white

4.1/4″ squares:  two brown, two yellow




Quarter square triangle layouts

Quarter square triangle layouts

Make the quarter square triangles

I’ve chosen to make the quarter square triangle units with individual triangles rather than making several at a time as I usually do.  Cut the 3.7/8″ white squares along one diagonal and cut the 4.1/4″ brown and yellow squares along both diagonals.  These are shown at the top of the photo.

For the corner blocks of the cobwebs quilt block, place one white triangle with a brown and a yellow triangle.  Sew the brown and yellow triangles together first and then sew this pairing to the white triangle.

Make the central block using two yellow and two brown triangles.  Place these so that the yellow triangles are top and bottom while the brown triangles are on the sides.  Sew the triangles into pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

Completed units

Completed units

The completed units are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Trim the corners where fabric sticks out.  You need to make four of the corner units with a white triangle but just one of the central block with yellow and brown triangles only.

Cobwebs quilt block layout

Cobwebs quilt block layout

Assemble the cobwebs quilt block

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.

Place the yellow/brown unit in the middle with a white square on each edge.  Lay the corner units in the remaining spaces with the white always on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt design ideas

For the basic quilt I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  I felt that the design of the block became lost in this design.

With added sashing

With added sashing

So for my next attempt I added sashing between the blocks.  I felt that this allowed the block design to show through.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Nine Patch Plaid Quilt Block Pattern

Nine patch plaid quilt block

Nine patch plaid quilt block

The nine patch plaid quilt block is an extremely easy block.  It would work for a jelly roll quilt and it has also given me an idea for a quilt to match some curtains that I’m making.  I’ve made it here as an 18″ square finished size and there’s not a half square triangle to be seen!

It may look slightly lopsided, but that gives you a lot of scope for changing the design by rotating the blocks within a quilt.

Cutting requirements for the nine patch plaid quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  eight light blue, six white, four dark blue

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  two white

15.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangle:  one dark blue

18.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangle:  one dark blue




Block layout

Block layout

Make the 9 patch plaid quilt block

Begin the layout with a white square in the middle. Place a dark blue square on each edge of the central square and add a light blue square in each corner of this central section.

Above the central section lay a 9.1/2″ white rectangle with a light blue square on either side of it.  Repeat for the bottom row.  Place three white squares down each side.  Finally place the 15.1/2″ dark blue rectangle across the top of the block and the 18.1/2″ dark blue rectangle down the left hand side.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

The reason that I have used white rectangles across top and bottom but individual squares down the sides is purely for simplicity.  By doing it this way I can sew the squares across each row before sewing them all together.

The squares without the dark blue rectangles make a 25 patch block.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Finally sew the top dark blue rectangle to the block and then add the other dark blue rectangle to the left hand side.

Quilt suggestions

Basic quilt suggestion

Basic quilt suggestion

I have shown a quilt with the nine patch plaid block laid out in four rows of four with no rotations.  Quite a pretty block, but not terribly interesting.

Quilt design with rotations

Quilt design with rotations

Once you introduce rotations, though, you can transform the quilt design.  I think that this makes a far more interesting design.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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