Opus Anglicanum – V&A Exhibition

Opus Anglicanum example

Opus Anglicanum example

The Opus Anglicanum exhibition at the V&A is wonderful – I am so pleased that I was able to go and see it.

What is Opus Anglicanum?

It is described by the V&A as being

Latin for ‘English work’, the phrase ‘opus anglicanum’ was first coined in the 13th century to describe the highly-prized and luxurious embroideries made in England of silk and gold and silver thread, teeming with elaborate imagery.




Examples of the embroidery

Postcards from the V&A

Postcards from the V&A

Much of the embroidery that I saw came from churches, but there were odd fragments from warhorse drapes.  All of it was several centuries old and the colours were remarkably well preserved for their age.  Apparently in those days it took about seven years of apprenticeship before one could be called an embroiderer.  Much of the work was so fine that I couldn’t see the individual stitches – the skill involved was breathtaking.

In the descriptions of the work, it seems that quite a few of the pieces involved split stitch embroidery and under couching.  These are both techniques that I need to learn more about.   The exhibition itself remains open till Sunday 5th February.

Lockwood Kipling exhibition

I then moved on to see the other exhibition that interested me:  Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London.  John Lockwood Kipling was hugely influential in the Arts and Crafts movement and this was really interesting.  I know of William Morris but must admit that I hadn’t come across Lockwood Kipling before.  He specialised in ceramics and pottery and there were some lovely exhibits.

Dress in the fashion and textile section

Dress in the fashion and textile section

Fashion and Textile Section

There was no photography allowed in the special exhibitions, so the photos above are of postcards that I bought.  However, photos are not only allowed, but encouraged in other parts of the museum, so I was able to take some in the one section that I always manage to see when I go to the V&A:  the fashion and textile section.  Imagine trying to walk or dance in this dress!

How uncomfortable!

How uncomfortable!

The same could be said about this dress.  I took copious notes of the things that I saw. If I could find my notes, I’d tell you more about the backgrounds to these dresses.

V&A pattern book

V&A pattern book

V&A shop

I kept myself on a tight rein in the shop and bought only the cards in the photos and one book.

The pattern book, highlighting the work of Owen Jones, kept me happy on my train journey home. This is how the V&A describes him:

Owen Jones was a versatile architect and designer, and one of the most influential design theorists of the 19th century. Through his work at the 1851 Great Exhibition, he was also a key figure in the foundation of the Victoria and Albert Museum.

I hadn’t come across his work before and there are some gorgeous designs in the book.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Square Up Quilt Block Pattern

Square up quilt block

Square up quilt block

The square up quilt block is a simple four patch block.  I’ve made it here as a 12″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the square up quilt block

3.7/8″ squares:  two each in red and white, two each in red and yellow, one each in yellow and gold, one each in yellow and white

3.1/2″ squares four red




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowance towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Square up quilt block layout

Square up quilt block layout

Make the square up quilt block

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  In the middle place the yellow/white and yellow/gold half square triangles. Make sure that the yellow triangle is always on the outside.  Place a red/white half square triangle in each corner with the white on the outside, forming the corner of the block.

On each edge of the block, between the corner squares, place a red/yellow half square triangle and a red square.  Notice how each pair of yellow triangles combine to form a larger yellow triangle.  These are the spokes of the star.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the square up quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt ideas

Although I think that this block is a great design, it loses itself if used on its own in a quilt.  I’ve shown it here with sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.

With sashing added

With sashing added

The simple addition of sashing makes a much better quilt, I feel.  Now the design of the block can be seen more easily.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

 

Pub Floor Tile Quilt Pattern

Pub floor tile quilt

Pub floor tile quilt

The design for the pub floor tile quilt pattern comes to you, of course, from the floor tiles in a pub that I visited recently.  They served a lovely red wine, so obviously it was a tough job researching this design to show you!

Floor tiles

Floor tiles

The quilt measures 78″ square.  I have used 1/2 yard each of grey and white fabrics, 1 yard each of black and blue with 1.3/4 yards of red and 2.1/2 yards of cream fabric.  I have tried to stay true to the colouring of the original floor tiles as far as possible.  The quilt blocks are 12″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the pub floor tile quilt

Central block:  four 3.1/2″ red squares, two 2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ cream rectangles, three 2.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ rectangles, two 2.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles

Corner blocks:  four 4.1/2″ cream squares, four 5.1/4″ black squares, four 5.1/4″ grey squares, eight 4.7/8″ grey squares, sixteen 3.3/8″ by 6.1/8″ white rectangles

For the rest of the quilt:

12.1/2″ by 44.1/2″:  four cream

12.1/2″ squares:  eight red

Black fabric:  twelve 12.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips, four 40.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips

2.1/2″ squares:  eight blue

For the borders you will need to cut eight 2.1/2″ strips of red and eight 3.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric.

Central block layout

Central block layout

Make the central quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown in the photo.  There are four red 3.1/2″ squares with an 8.1/2″ cream strip between them horizontally and two 3.1/2″ cream strips between them vertically.  At each side there’s an 8.1/2″ cream strip and at the top and bottom there’s a 12.1/2″ cream strip.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the red squares together in columns with the cream strips between them. Then you can sew the columns together across the central area.  Finally add the cream strips at the top and bottom.  You only need to make one of this block.

Central area of block

Central area of block

Make the diamond in a square

These are a little more complicated, but still easy if you take it in small steps.

Cut a 5.1/4″ black square along both diagonals to make four triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 4.1/2″ cream square.  Sew the triangles to the square on the top and bottom, press and then sew the remaining two triangles to the sides.  Press the triangles open and trim the middle of each edge where the fabric sticks out.

Make the central row of the block

Central row of the block

Central row of the block

Use this diamond in a square to form the central row of the block.  Place a white rectangle on each side with a grey triangle at each end of the row.  These triangles are made by cutting a 4.7/8″ square along one diagonal.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across the row.

Add the top section

Full layout of the corner block

Full layout of the corner block

The top section of the block is made in two rows.  Place a white triangle above the central row with a grey triangle on either side. These triangles are made by cutting a 5.1/4″ grey square along both diagonals to form four triangles.

Then above that row place a larger grey triangle (made from a 4.7/8″ square).  Note that the two smaller grey triangles are placed so that the right angled corner (the square corner) lie against the bottom of the white rectangle.

Complete the corner block

Add the top of the block first

Add the top of the block first

Sew these pieces together across the row and then sew them to the central row.

The bottom part of the block is very similar, but the smaller grey triangles are placed so that the square corners lie against the top of the white rectangle, rather than the bottom as they were in the top section.

Sew these two rows to the central row to complete the block.  You need to make four of these.

Assemble the central area

Layout for central area

Layout for central area

Having made the blocks, it is easy now to pull everything together.  Place the eight 12.1/2″ red squares around the central block.  Place two 12.1/2″ black strips between each pair of squares so that each row contains three blocks and two black strips.

Sew the blocks together across the rows.

Add sashing strips between the rows

Add sashing strips between the rows

In order to join the rows to each other, make two sashing strips of three black strips with two blue squares between them.  Now you can sew the rows together.

Add sashing around this area

Add sashing around this area

In order to complete the black sashing around the central area, sew a 40.1/2″ strip of black to the top and bottom.  Sew a blue square to both ends of the remaining two 40.1/2″ black strips and sew these to the sides.

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

This bit is really simple.  First sew a 40.1/2″ cream strip to the top and bottom.  Now sew a corner block to each end of the remaining two cream strips.  Sew these strips to the sides of the quilt.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 68.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

Finally add the second border of 3.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pub floor tile quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding – plenty of open spaces for quilting.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Sarehole Mill

Sarehole Mill

J R R Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, spent part of his childhood in Birmingham. The other day (when I was lost), I happened upon a sign for Sarehole Mill.  Tolkien and his brother used to play in and around the mill.

It was too late in the day for me to visit the inside of the mill, but I was able to wander around the outside and it’s definitely somewhere I will return to.

Sarehole mill pond

Sarehole mill pond

It’s such a calm place – an oasis of quiet set within some quite busy roads.  I see that there is a Tolkien trail around Birmingham, so that’s a must for the summer.

Electric Fan Quilt Block Pattern

Electric fan quilt block

Electric fan quilt block

The electric fan quilt block is perhaps not appropriate for the time of year – but we can always dream and pretend that the weather is hot enough to warrant an electric fan!  It’s a four patch block and I have made it here as a 12″ square.

Cutting requirements for the electric fan quilt block

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in blue and white, four each in blue and red




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use all the squares to make half square triangles in the pairings listed above.  Place a blue square right sides together with either a red or a white square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Electric fan quilt block layout

Electric fan quilt block layout

Make the electric fan quilt block

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  I find that it helps to look for the larger shapes in order to be sure that you have placed the squares correctly.  There’s a larger white triangle formed by two white triangles along each edge of the block.  A larger blue triangle forms the other half of each edge.  The middle of the block is made with a blue/red pinwheel layout.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the electric fan quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt ideas

The first quilt design shows sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  I felt that the design of the block became lost in this quilt design

Same design with sashing

Same design with sashing

For the second design I added 2″ white sashing and this separates the blocks out, which I feel gives a better looking quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Jacobs Ladder Diamond Quilt

Jacobs ladder diamond quilt

Jacobs ladder diamond quilt

I’ve made the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt using a variation of the Jacobs Ladder quilt block, but I’ve used rotations of the block to give the diamond design and I’ve put a red square in the middle to tie in with the red border.

The quilt measures 84″ square and I’ve used thirty six 12″ square blocks.  Fabric used was 1.1/4 yards of dark blue, 1.3/4 yards of medium blue with 2 yards of light blue, 3/4 yard each of yellow and green and 1.3/4 yards of red.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  I have deliberately used solid fabrics because I want to use quilting to highlight the diamond shapes and I thought that this would show up better with plain rather than patterned fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  three hundred and fifty six medium blue, four red, two hundred and eighty eight light blue, sixteen dark blue

4.7/8″ squares:  thirty six each in green and light blue, thirty six each in yellow and dark blue

For the border you will need to cut four 6.7/8″ squares in red and in dark blue, together with eight 6.1/2″ red strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles using the 4.7/8″ squares in light blue/green and in dark blue/yellow.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

You’ll also need to make half square triangles with the 6.7/8″ red and dark blue squares for the border.  These will give you 6.1/2″ squares.

Make 4 patch units

Make 4 patch units

Make the four patch units

There are so many four patch units required that I would recommend strip piecing.  Sew 2.1/2″ lengths of light blue/medium blue or medium blue/dark blue together along the length.  Cut at 2.1/2″ intervals.  This will give you rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″, each containing two squares.  Sew these rectangles together in pairs, rotating them so that the colours are diagonally opposite each other.

You will need four of these units with a red square replacing the medium blue in the top left corner.

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Assemble the Jacobs Ladder quilt block

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  In the first row there’s a light blue/medium blue at each end and a light blue/green half square triangle in the middle.  The second row is made with a medium blue/light blue four patch unit in the middle, a green/light blue triangle unit n the left and a dark blue/yellow triangle unit on the right.  For the third row you need a medium blue/light blue four patch unit on the left, a yellow/dark blue triangle unit in the middle and a medium blue/dark blue four patch unit on the right.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make thirty two of these.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Assemble the alternate block

I have changed just one square in the alternate block.  The top left square is red instead of medium blue.  You need to make four of this version of the block.

Assemble the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt

Rows 1 and 2

Rows 1 and 2

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  Rows one and two are exactly the same as each other.  I’ll describe the blocks in terms of the stripe formed by the lines of the triangles.  In the first three blocks these stripes go up from bottom left to top right.  For the second three blocks the stripes go down from top left to bottom right

Rows 3 and 4

Rows 3 and 4

In row three the first two and last two blocks are the same as in the first two rows.  The middle two blocks are the alternate blocks and they are placed so that the red squares are side by side at the bottom of the row.

Row four is where the design starts to form the bottom part of the overall diamond design.  The first two blocks have the stripes going down from top left to bottom right.  These are followed by two alternate blocks with the red squares together at the top of the row.  In the final two blocks the stripes go up from bottom left to top right.

Rows 5 and 6

Rows 5 and 6

Finally rows five and six are the same as each other.  The first three blocks in these rows have the stripes running down from top left to bottom right while the last three blocks have the stripes running up from bottom left to top right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

The borders are made with two red/dark blue triangles in the middle and lengths of red fabric on either side.  For the top and bottom of the quilt sew 30.1/2″ lengths of red to each side of the triangles.  Sew 36.1/2″ lengths of red to the sides of the triangles for the sides of the quilt.  The half square triangles are made from 6.7/8″ squares and the red fabric strips are 6.1/2″ wide.

That completes the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

There are no sightseeing photos this week, I’m afraid.  I’ve had real problems with my computer system and most of the week has been spent trying to sort these out.  This morning I’m off to the dentist and this afternoon I shall sit back and relax!
Craftsy

Easy Do Quilt Block Pattern

Easy Do quilt block

Easy Do quilt block

Easy Do quilt block – now there’s a name to warm the heart! It actually is a very easy block to make and I’ve made it here as a 20″ square. You wouldn’t need too many of them to make a quilt.

Cutting requirements for the easy do quilt block

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen brown, sixteen light yellow, eight medium yellow, eight white

4.1/2″ squares:  one brown

8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  four dark yellow

2.7/8″ squares:  four each in medium yellow and light yellow, four each in medium yellow and white




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the corner units

Layout for the corners

Layout for the corners

The corner units are all the same as each other, and I think that the block is much more easy to follow if you make the corners separately first.  Lay the squares out in four rows of four as shown.

Across the first row place brown, white, medium yellow and a medium yellow/light yellow half square triangle.  The second row is made using white, brown, medium yellow/white half square triangle and a light yellow square.

In the third row there’s a medium yellow square followed by medium yellow/white half square triangle, then a brown and light yellow square.  Finally the fourth row is made using a medium yellow/light yellow half square triangle followed by two yellow and one brown square.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make four of these corner units.

Easy Do quilt block layout

Easy Do quilt block layout

Assembling the easy do quilt block

Place one corner unit in each corner, rotating them so that the brown squares always follow the diagonals.  Form a middle row using two of the dark yellow rectangles and a brown 4.1/2″ square between them.  Place a dark yellow rectangle vertically between the top two corners and between the bottom two rectangles.

Sew the units together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the easy do quilt block.

Quilt suggestion

Easy do quilt suggestion

Easy do quilt suggestion

This is how the block would look if nine blocks were sewn together in three rows of three.  I feel that this is a delightful quilt that you could make in many different colour combinations.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

 

Times Remembered Quilt Pattern

Times remembered quilt

Times remembered quilt

I chose the Times Remembered quilt block for this quilt because that’s what I always find myself doing at the start of a new year – taking a glance back at the previous year.  Whether or not you do the same, I hope that you thoroughly enjoyed your festive break and will have a wonderful new year.

The Star and Cross block is my choice for an alternative.  I’m quite pleased with the way that it forms a circle around the central area of the quilt.  There are sixteen blocks – eight of each – and they are all 15″ square finished size.  Altogether I used 1/2 yard of dark blue, 3/4 yard of medium blue, 1.1/4 yards of light blue, 1.1/2 yards each of red and white fabrics.  The quilt measures 66″ square.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the times remembered quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  forty dark blue, forty eight medium blue, thirty two light blue for the times remembered blocks,  together with forty eight white and sixty four light blue for the star and cross quilt

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight medium blue, eight red for the times block, together with eight white for the star block

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in red and white for the times block, together with thirty two each in light blue and white for the star block

For the border you will need seven 2.1/2″ strips of red cut across the width of fabric.

Making half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

I’ve used 3.7/8″ squares for the half square triangles, in the colour pairings listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Times remembered quilt block layout

Times remembered quilt block layout

Make the times remembered quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out as shown in the photo.  Place a dark blue square in each corner and in the middle.  Add a light blue square on each edge of the central square and a red/white half square triangle in each corner of that central area.  Place these so that the white triangles are on the outside, forming the corners of that area.

For the outer frame you need a medium blue rectangle at the top, a red rectangle at the bottom and three medium blue squares on each side.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Star and cross quilt block layout

Star and cross quilt block layout

Make the star and cross quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown.  Form the central cross with a white rectangle in row three and a white square above and below it.  Place a white square in each corner of the block, with a blue/white half square triangle forming a butterfly shape across each corner.

Place a light blue square in the middle of each edge of the block.  Add the remaining light blue squares diagonally inside each white corner square.

Sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the times remembered quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  In row one place two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end of the row.  Place these so that the red rectangles are at the bottom of the blocks.

Row two

Row two

The second row is made with two times blocks in the middle and a star block at each end.  Place the times blocks so that the red rectangle is first on the right and then on the bottom of the blocks.

Row three

Row three

For the third row the blocks are the same as for the second row, but this time the red rectangles are first on the top and then on the left of the blocks.  This is how the cross in the centre of the quilt is formed.

Row four

Row four

Finally the fourth row comprises two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end.  Rotate the times blocks so that the red rectangles are at the top of the blocks.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

I’ve used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the quilt border.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Times Remembered quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Earlswood lakes

Earlswood lakes

I’ve had a very relaxing break.  While my sewing machine was carefully tidied away I took lots of lovely walks.  One in particular to Earlswood Lakes gave me some gorgeous scenes of the sun shining on the water:  sometimes my camera just shows this as a blur, but for some reason this time it showed the sun’s reflection beautifully.  I think that I’ll have to try and use this particular photo as the basis of a quilt.

Holly's vest

Holly’s vest

In addition I wanted to share with you a baby vest that I adapted for my granddaughter, Holly.  It was very simple to make – I added some text to a photo of Christmas fabric and then printed it on plain fabric.  I sewed that and a holly shape on to the vest, giving a festive vest.  It was a really simple way of personalising a gift for her.

Red Hat Quilt – Free Pattern

Red hat quilt

Red hat quilt

This red hat quilt pattern was a request.  The members of the Red Hat Society wear red hats with purple outfits, so I decided to use both red and purple hats in the quilt.  I was asked for a very simple quilt pattern, so I designed the most simple hat quilt block that I could using two shades of colour and then made the blocks in both red and purple.

Each block measures 12″ square finished size and I have used 3/4 yard of dark red with 1 yard each of light red, dark purple and light purple.  The quilt itself is 52″ square.




Cutting requirements for the red hat quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  eight dark purple, eight dark red

2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight dark purple, eight dark red

2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light purple, eight light red

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  sixteen light purple, sixteen light red

2″ squares:  sixteen light purple, sixteen light red

3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light purple, eight light red

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ strips of dark purple fabric cut across the width of fabric.

Red hat quilt block layout

Red hat quilt block layout

Make the red hat quilt block

Lay the pieces out as shown.  The first row is the 2″ by 12.1/2″ strip.  In the second row the dark purple square is in the middle with a 3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ light purple rectangle on each side.

For the third row you need to place the dark purple strip in the middle with a 2″ light purple square on each side.  Finally the fifth row is the 3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ light purple rectangle.

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows in the second and third rows.

Then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  Make eight blocks in purple and eight blocks in red.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Assemble the red hat quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four, alternating the purple and red across the rows and down the columns.

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of dark purple.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the red hat quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Rocky Road to Dublin Quilt Block

Rocky road to Dublin quilt block

Rocky road to Dublin quilt block

The Rocky Road to Dublin quilt block is my first offering of 2017.  I wish you a very Happy New Year.  This is a nine patch block that I have made as an 18″ square.

Cutting requirements for the Rocky Road to Dublin quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  fourteen white, six blue, four red

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in blue and red, two each in blue and white




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above to make the half square triangles.  Place a blue square with either a red or a white square, right sides together, and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the quilt block

Rocky road to Dublin quilt block layout

Rocky road to Dublin quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  If you look at the larger shapes, then it’s not such a complicated layout as it may seem to be.

There are white squares along one complete diagonal and blue squares along the other diagonal.  Beside two corners there are white/blue half squares forming a butterfly shape.  The other two corners are blue/white four patch units – as is the middle of the block.  All the red triangles and squares are placed so as to form four larger red triangles.  Each pair of these large red triangles forms a butterfly shape.

When you’re happy with the layout, sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the rocky road to Dublin quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt designs

The basic quilt design, using sixteen of the blocks, gives a decent but not terribly interesting quilt.

Some blocks rotated

Some blocks rotated

However, when you rotate half the blocks it forms a very eyecatching quilt – much more interesting.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Cats and Mice Quilt Block Pattern

Cats and mice quilt block

Cats and mice quilt block

I have made the Cats and Mice quilt block absolutely enormous for two very good reasons.  The first reason is that I hope that it makes the instructions more clear and the second is that it can now be a central medallion for a quick Linus quilt.  I have made it as a 24″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the cats and mice quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  eight brown, sixteen white, eight cream

3.7/8″ squares:  eight each in cream and white, four each in brown and white, further four squares in cream for the quarter square triangles

4.1/4″ squares:  two white, two brown




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Place the 3.7/8″ squares with right sides together in the pairings listed above.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.  Put these aside so that they don’t get mixed up with the quarter square triangle units.

Make quarter square triangle units

Make quarter square triangle units

The quarter square triangle units

Make half square triangle units as above using the 4.1/4″ brown and white squares.  Place the resulting units right sides together with 3.7/8″ cream squares.  Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses the seam and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.

Cut along the line to produce two quarter square triangle units.  Note that these are not the same as each other – the brown and white triangles are in different positions within each unit.

Central area of the block

Central area of the block

Central area

The central area of the block is a diamond in a square block.  I have chosen to make it with half square triangles this time, but of course you can make it using a different method if you choose.

There are four white squares in the middle and one in each corner.  On each edge of the central square place two cream/white half square triangle units.  Place them so that the cream triangles always form a larger triangle pointing away from the middle.

The next frame

Add the next frame

Add the next frame

For the next frame place a dark brown square in each corner, with two cream squares in the middle of each edge.  Now the quarter square triangles need some care!  I have placed the four in the top half of the block correctly.  I have placed the two in row five correctly.  However the two in the bottom row are not correct in the photo.  They should be swapped with each other.

Concentrate on the white square inside this frame:  it should be a plain square, but instead there are two white triangles added to the square at the bottom.  If the two quarter square triangles are swapped the white triangles will be on the outside, not the inside.

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

Add the final frame

Finally, add the outer frame.  There’s a brown square in each corner with a brown/white half square triangle on each side of the corners.  Place two cream/white half square triangles in the middle of each edge, with a white square on either side of these.

Check and double check the placement of your quarter square triangles – they are still wrong in this photo, but luckily I did notice and correct them while I was sewing everything together.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the cats and mice quilt block.

Medallion cats and mice quilt

Medallion cats and mice quilt

Cats and Mice Quilt designs

This is how I intend to use my cats and mice quilt block – with three borders to make a small 36″ square quilt.

Alternative design

Alternative design

This is how the block looks if you made it smaller and then used several in a quilt.  I’ve actually shown sixteen blocks here, which is perhaps a little optimistic!

Here’s the video:

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