RUNNING STITCH

The first running stitch

The first running stitch

Running stitch is easily the most common stitch in any form of sewing or quilting.  It may be called different names depending on the size of stitch, but the method of stitching is the same.

 

How to sew running stitch

Usually I begin with a double stitch to secure the thread.  Push the needle down through the fabric and then up again 1/4″ to the left.  You could also tie a knot in the end of the thread and pull the thread through from behind the fabric if you preferred.

 

Start with a double stitch

Start with a double stitch

Repeat the stitches in a line

Repeat the sttiches in a line

Return the needle to where you began and repeat the stitch.  Push the needle down 1/4″ to the left and up again a further 1/4″ t the left.  Pull the needle through and pull the thread until it just sits flat – too tight and you will pucker the fabric and too loose will look messy.  With experience you can put the needle through several running stitches before pulling the thread through.

Examples of running stitch

Very generally, basting is a long running stitch and hand quilting is a short running stitch, but there are all sorts of variations in between.

Quilting with a small running stitch

Quilting with a small running stitch

Quilting with a large running stitch

Quilting with a large running stitch

 

The quilt block on the left was quilted with a short running stitch while the quilt block on the right was quilted with a long running stitch and in a contrasting colour to make it stand out.

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