CONTINUOUS BIAS BINDING





Continuous bias binding

Continuous bias binding

When I first began sewing many centuries ago, all the binding that I used was always cut on the bias.  In those days the binding would have been for sleeves or necklines and almost always on a curve.  For quilt binding I use straight cut folded binding most of the time because most of my quilts have straight edges.  some quilters prefer to use bias binding and that’s a matter of personal choice.  If you do prefer bias binding, there is a way of cutting a continuous length which saves enormous amounts of time.

 

Mark the fabric for continuous bias binding

Draw lines at 45 degrees

Draw lines at 45 degrees

I began with a 21″ by 10″ rectangle of fabric although you can use any size, and I ended up with a length of about 70″ of 2″ bias binding.  Line up the 45 degrees line on your ruler with the bottom edge of the fabric and draw a line from the bottom left corner of the fabric up to the top edge.  Move the ruler along 2″ and draw another line.  Continue until your line reaches the top right corner of the fabric.

 

 

Cut off the excess triangles

Cut off the excess triangles

Pin and sew the seam

Pin and sew the seam

Cut off the excess triangles to either side of your lines.  fold the remaining piece of fabric in half from top to bottom with right sides together.  Line up the first line of one edge with the second line of the other edge.  Pin across the seam and sew a 1/4″ seam.  You’ll end up with a tube of fabric with a diagonal seam joining the two fabric edges.  I know this doesn’t sound totally clear, but the video can explain it more clearly than photos can.

Cut the continuous bias binding

Begin cutting at one of these flaps

Begin cutting at one of these flaps

Cut along the marked lines

Cut along the marked lines

You should have a flap of fabric at either end of the seam.  Begin cutting along the line at one of these flaps and cut along the line.  You’ll find that because the lines were matched up you will be able to keep cutting round and round the tube of fabric and you will end up with a continuous length of binding.

 

Continuous bias binding

Continuous bias binding

 

It’s not strictly continuous bias binding because there are seams, but these were made with just one seam at the beginning rather than lots of fiddly small seams.  I think that it’s a great way of making binding if you need to have it cut on the bias.  If you then want to make it into tape, I find that a bias tape maker is really useful.

 

 

Here’s the video:

 

 

 

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