Disappearing Five Patch Quilt Pattern

Disappearing five patch quilt

Disappearing five patch quilt

This disappearing five patch quilt is my take on the better known disappearing nine or four patch quilts.  I don’t think that I’ve seen one using a five patch block and I’m quite pleased with the way it has turned out.  The quilt measures about 47″ square and I’ve used 1/2 yard each of dark blue, light blue and white with 3/4 yard of red fabric.

I’ve used nine very simple five patch blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the disappearing five patch quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  seventy two dark blue, seventy two white, seventy two light blue, nine red

For the border you will need to cut five 3.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric.




Five patch block layout

Five patch block layout

Make the five patch block

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  Place a red square in the middle.  Add a dark blue square in each corner and on each edge of the red square.  Place light blue squares to form a diamond shape around the dark blue/red area.  Lay two white squares in the remaining spaces on each edge.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make nine of them.

Blocks cut along the middle lines

Blocks cut along the middle lines

Cut the blocks

Originally I had planned to cut the blocks along the horizontal and vertical, but the resulting blocks weren’t terribly interesting.

Cut the blocks along both diagonals

Cut the blocks along both diagonals

Instead I decided to cut each block along both diagonal lines to make four triangles from each block.  This gives a much more interesting block to work with.

Cut all the blocks along the diagonals so that you have thirty six triangles to work with.

Place 3 triangles side by side

Place 3 triangles side by side

Lay out the first row

I have used twelve triangles in each row, so there will be three rows altogether.

Begin by placing three triangles side by side with the red triangles at the bottom.

Add triangles beneath and at the ends

Add triangles beneath and at the ends

Now add two triangles beneath them with the red triangles at the top.  In addition, place one triangle at each end with the red triangles pointing towards the middle of the quilt.

Add two more triangles

Add two more triangles

For the next section add two more triangles with the red triangles pointing downwards.  You’ll see that these form squares with the triangles above them.

Complete layout for one row

Complete layout for one row

Finally lay three more triangles across the bottom with the red triangles pointing upwards.  This is the full layout for one row of the disappearing five patch quilt.

Begin sewing the triangles together

Begin sewing the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

The method of sewing these triangles together is not as complicated as it might look at first sight.  Begin by sewing together two triangles to form the bottom left corner.  Also sew together two triangles to form the top right corner of the row.  In the middle, sew together two pairs of triangles to make two diamonds (squares on point).

Sew triangles to the diamonds

Sew triangles to the diamonds

Now sew one triangle to the top left and bottom right of each of the diamonds.

Suddenly you just have four sections to sew together in easy straight lines!

The rectangle now measures approximately 41.1/2″ by 14″.  The reason that I say approximately is because on each triangle there are two edges which are cut on the bias (diagonal) so there is more give in those edges and your row might end up slightly larger or smaller than mine did.

Trim the seam allowances

Trim the seam allowances

The important thing is to match up the small red triangles when you are sewing the big triangles together.

You need to trim the seam allowances where they stick out to reduce bulk in the quilt.

Make three rows and sew them to each other.

Red for the border

Red for the border

Add the border

I’ve used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of about 41″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of about 47″ for the sides – do measure the sides of your quilt before cutting the border strips.

That completes the disappearing five patch quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Barbarians vs New Zealand

Barbarians vs New Zealand

Last week I mentioned that I was going to Twickenham – what an amazing day that was.  If you live outside the UK, you may not know that Twickenham is considered to be the home of English rugby and the stadium has a very special feel to it.

The flags of the Barbarians and of New Zealand were held aloft during the National Anthems.  I did take a video of this part of the proceedings but haven’t been able to work out how to transfer it from my phone to here.

Planes flying over the stadium

Planes flying over the stadium

Twickenham is on the flight path to Heathrow Airport and there were planes over flying us throughout the match – it made me realise just how busy an airport it is.

Try celebrations

Try celebrations

Every time a try was scored we were treated to this fiery display – and there were lots of tries!

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Comments

  1. This looks wonderful! It’s the kind of thing I’d repeatedly get wrong and have to go back to correct. I think I like it so much because it looks so unusual. Twickenham is indeed a fantastic experience – only been once in the 80’s and loved every second. Amazing how rugby crowds are so well behaved compared to football throngs.

    • Hi June. I often have to go back and correct things as I’m making them – my seam ripper is constantly by my side! Yes, we were struck by how good natured the crowd was – 62,000 people and not a hint of trouble.

  2. Gwendy Burtz says:

    I love seeing quits idea that you cut apart and sew back together!!! Such a neat idea.

  3. Sandra Barnett says:

    Oh Rose,
    How clever of you. I like this idea very much. I have been making other crafts and not really sewing. I too like to see a quilt finished.
    Christmas is coming too fast. I feel like Santa trying to finish all my tasks.
    Glad you had a great time at your game looks like it would be fun to watch. Think after the new year I will try this pattern.
    Have a great weekend and Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Thanks, Sandra. It’s definitely a busy time of year for all of us, isn’t it. Hope you manage to finish everything you’re trying to do.

  4. Rose, next to your beautiful stained glass quilt, this one might very well become my favorite. Thank you so much for sharing your creations and making them seem so simple.

  5. Dear Rose, Your quilt is so eye catching. I really like it. I’ve never seen anything quite like it before. Glad you had such a good time watching rugby.

  6. I really like your quilt. It looks like a trompe l’oeil. Look at one way and see something else. And you are correct, it does look very doable.

    I was surprised to read that football was played in England way back in the 11th century. I always thought it was an American sport. Maybe gridiron football. As kids we used to play baseball and tennis. I learned how to play golf in my 30s. I was never good at it but I love to watch it on TV.

    • Hi Claire. Isn’t that funny – I’d always thought of American football as a spinoff of our football, while you thought of it the other way round. Any sport played well is good to watch, isn’t it.

  7. Wow, so who won? Disgraceful I know as I live in New Zealand but sports do not interest me!

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