Moreton Hall Quilt Pattern – Stained Glass

Moreton Hall quilt

Moreton Hall quilt

The Moreton Hall quilt pattern is based on the outer walls of Little Moreton Hall.  When I showed you a photo after I had visited the hall, several quilters commented on what a lovely quilt it would make – and they were absolutely right!

Little Moreton Hall

Little Moreton Hall

I began with the stark black and white design that is common to Tudor buildings but then decided that I wanted some colour.  The addition of red and blue changed the look of the quilt completely.  Suddenly it began to look like a stained glass window.  I’m thrilled with it!




The quilt is rectangular, measuring about 47″ by 56″, using sixteen blocks which are also rectangular.  I have used 1/2 yard of blue fabric, 3/4 yard of white, 1 yard of red and 1.1/2 yards of black fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s Moreton Hall quilt kit.  Several people told me that they had trouble with the checkout process when they were buying fabric.  Thanks for alerting me to this – it has now been fixed and you should be able to use the Secure Checkout tab without any problems.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Moreton Hall quilt

Black fabric:  thirty two rectangles 1.7/8″ by 12.1/2″, thirty two rectangles 1.7/8″ by 6.7/8″.  For the sashing and borders you will need twelve rectangles 2″ by 10.1/2″ as well as eleven 2″ strips cut across the width of fabric.

Red fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 9.3/4″, eight 2.7/8″ squares.  For the border you will need five 3.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric.

Blue fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 9.3/4″, eight 2.7/8″ squares.

White fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 13.7/8″.

Shaping the rectangles

Shaping the rectangles

Make the first half of the block

Cut the red and blue squares along one diagonal to make two triangles.  Each block contains a triangle in two corners and the rest of the block comprises stripes of varying size and colour.

To make the stripes in red, blue and black, fold down the top corner on each end of the rectangles so that it touches the bottom edge.  This forms a fold running from the bottom corner of the rectangle to the top edge.  Cut along the fold.

I would recommend that you don’t cut the white rectangles until you are ready to place them – the cuts are different for the white and I felt that it was safer to cut them when I could see which direction the edges need to point.

Begin in the bottom left corner

Begin in the bottom left corner

Begin with a blue triangle in the bottom left corner of the block.  Add a black stripe cut from a 6.7/8″ rectangle.  Now add a blue stripe cut from a 9.3/4″ rectangle.

I’ve shown the blue triangles that I have cut off to help you see where the cuts were made.

Continue with a black stripe cut from a 12.1/2″ rectangle.

Add the white stripe

Cut the white rectangle

Cut the white rectangle

Now comes the white stripe.  Follow the photo and fold down the top right corner of the rectangle.  Fold up the bottom left corner of the rectangle.  Cut along the folds.

Place the white stripe

Place the white stripe

Now lay the white stripe in place.  The black stripe above it is from another 12.1/2″ rectangle.  Notice that the stripes below the white were all placed like a bowl with the shorter edge at the bottom.  Place the black stripe above the white with the shorter edge at the top, like a mountain.

Look along the left hand edge and you’ll see a (more or less) straight line which will be the left hand edge of the block.  From the black stripe above the white the edge starts to run across the top of the block.

Complete layout

Complete layout

Continue adding stripes – a red stripe from a 9.3/4″ rectangle followed by a black stripe from a 6.7/8″ rectangle.  The red triangle completes the layout for this block.

Sew the stripes together, beginning with the blue triangle and adding stripes.

The blue overlaps the black

The blue overlaps the black

The triangle overlaps the black rectangle.  This means that when you press the triangle open you will get a straight line across the seam.  The same applies on each seam.

Press the block and trim the seams to remove all the ends of triangles sticking out.  I had intended the blocks to be 8.1/2″ by 10.1/2″ but mine ended up measuring 8″ by 10″.  The important thing is to keep all the blocks the same size as each other.  You need to make eight of them.

Make the second block

Make the second block

Make the second block

Not being the brightest button in the box, I had planned on rotating the blocks to form the design – until I remembered that the blocks were rectangular.  So the second block is almost exactly the same as the first, but the stripes move in a different direction.  I’ve shown the two blocks next to each other so that you can see how similar they are.

I built up the second block (on the left) from the bottom right corner, rather than the bottom left.  Follow the triangle with the same stripes in the same order.  Just pay special attention to the white stripe.  If you cut this stripe so that the edges are horizontal rather than vertical you will end up with another block the same as the first.  I know because that’s what I did!  My seam ripper worked hard while I made this quilt.  You need to fold the bottom right corner up and the top left corner down.  Apart from that the block is identical to the first.  Make eight of these as well.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Moreton Hall quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  Rows one and three are the same as each other.  Alternate the blocks across the row so that they form the top half of two red diamonds.

Lay three sashing strips between the blocks so that you have sashing between all of the blocks but not at the ends of the rows.

Rows two and four

Rows two and four

Rows two and four are the same as each other.  Lay the blocks so that they form the bottom half of two red diamonds.  Again, place three sashing strips between the blocks of each row.

Sew the blocks and sashing together across each row.

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

Join the rows with sashing

Cut five 2″ black strips to use as sashing between the rows.  These will be about 36.1/2″ long.  Sew one strip to the top of the first row, then one between all the rows and one at the bottom of the quilt.

Add sashing to the sides

Add sashing to the sides

In order to enclose the design fully, sew a 2″ black strip to each side of the quilt.  These will be about 47.1/2″ long.

Add the Moreton Hall quilt borders

I wanted a strong frame for the quilt, so I added two more borders.  For the first of these I used 3.1/2″ strips of red:  two lengths of 39.1/2 for the top and bottom and two lengths of 53.1/2″ for the sides.

For the final border I returned to the 2″ black strips:  two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.  These measurements for the borders are all approximate.

That completes the Moreton Hall quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Llandrindodd Wells

Llandrindodd Wells

My travels this week took me to Wales.  I visited several lovely areas but for this week I’ll just mention Llandrindodd Wells.  I hadn’t realised that this used to be a spa town – although the name of the town should have given me a clue!  On my way to see the old Victorian bath house I came across a gorgeous small forest all set up with walking trails.  Beside one particularly pretty section with a waterfall these four chairs (the four Kings) had been set up.  They were designed by a local artist and they were a real pleasure to see – so fitting for their surroundings.

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Comments

  1. Such a beautiful design Rose – it would blend into any vintage quilt. Love the chairs also,anyone who has a flair for woodwork – a challenge.

  2. Hi Rose so pleased you had a lovely trip to Wales. I have the feeling that your trip will inspire another quilt sometime in the future. This week’s design is so very striking and I think you have used completely plain fabrics. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing more about your trip.

    All best Janny

    • Hi Janny. Yes, there will definitely be a quilt out of my Welsh trip. I went to Port Meirion as well – somewhere that has been on my list for a very long time – photos next week. Yes, they were plain fabrics – I didn’t want a patterned fabric to take away from the design.

  3. Cate Williams says:

    V striking, Rose – I think it’s a triumph! Only wish I could remember designs like this when planning my next project – I keep your mails, but…

  4. Another stunning pattern – thank you Rose. I love the inspiration from the building – so clever! I am currently up to my eyes in Christmas – but will be purchasing from you again soon.
    Warmest wishes, Brenda

    • Thanks, Brenda. I think we’re all feeling a bit overwhelmed with Christmas projects – isn’t it amazing how quickly we get to this stage.

  5. I was thinking of you yesterday, I was in Ludlow just stopping over on the way back from Stratford upon Avon after a couple of days. Sunshine and heavy showers. Glad to be back in Wales Gwenda

    • Hi Gwenda. We certainly had lovely weather while we were in Wales. Hope you enjoyed your time in Stratford. It’s quite near for me since I moved to Birmingham.

  6. Diane Pannell says:

    Love the idea of this quilt Rose, It’s another on my ‘to do’ list

  7. Christine Bower says:

    Hello Rose, Thank you for the lovely Moreton Hall Quilt, I went there when I was a little girl. I always remember the room with the sloping floor, the guide told us the room was haunted, quite scary with my 2 brothers having fun with it when we got home. I do agree it is a lovely place.
    I hope you enjoyed meeting your old friend, lots to talk about I guess

    • Hi Christine. We weren’t told about Moreton Hall being haunted – it obviously made a big impression on you if you still remember it now. Yes, thanks, it was lovely seeing my school friends again.

  8. Sandra Barnett says:

    Oh Rose,
    Love the quilt and yes you can use Christmas colours or spring colours the possibilites are endless. You go on some very nice adventures. Thank you for taking me along. Hope you have fun talking and laughing with your old classmate. It is always good to see folks we have not seen in awhile.Have a great weekend and Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Thanks, Sandra. I hadn’t seen one of the ladies at the lunch today for 46 years – yes, definitely quite a bit of catching up! As you say, the quilt could be made in most colour combinations.

  9. Hi Rose, Your pattern does look like a stain glass window. It’s a very pretty pattern. I’ll tell you that if Moreton Hall was situated here in the US during the hurricane season that it would have totally been demolished. Lucky you for not having that kind of weather in the U.K. We are expecting another hurricane heading our way on Tuesday and Wednesday. This one is named Jose. I’m keeping my fingers crossed hoping that it goes out to sea.

    • Oh Claire I’ll join you in keeping my fingers crossed that Jose goes out to sea. The devastation left by the hurricanes has been so dreadful – as you say, we are very lucky here in the UK. Stay safe.

  10. I suppose if you really wanted it to look like Moreton Hall you’d have to make it in black, grey and white. It’s wonderful that you start out with one thing in mind and discover something altogether different along the way – this stained glass effect is so much more attractive than monochrome Tudor. I think the ‘secret’ four chairs are magical – lovely that you found them.

    • Hi June. You’re right – I had intended to make a monochrome quilt. Somehow it didn’t seem to have any zing, so I’m really pleased that I added the blue and red. The chairs were amazing. I had wondered into the area looking for the Victorian bath house (now a museum) and found the chairs by accident. what a lovely surprise they were.

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