Tippecanoe Quilt – Free Pattern

Tippecanoe quilt

Tippecanoe quilt

The Tippecanoe quilt is a little different from my usual in that you need  to use templates, but it is still a very easy quilt to make.  It seems that the tippecanoe quilt block is named for an 1811 battle in Indiana, America.

I have made the quilt 40″ square – a decent size for a lap quilt pattern.  I used thirty six blocks, all 6″ square finished size.  The fabric requirements are 1/4 yard each of yellow and medium blue, 1/2 yard each of brown and light blue, with 3/4 yard of dark blue.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Tippecanoe quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  eight light blue, six medium blue and six dark blue

tippecanoe templates:  sixteen of each template

For the border you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue across the width of fabric.

First template

Second template

I apologise for the two templates being separate, but I couldn’t work out how to make them into one document.

Print and cut out the templates

Print and cut out the templates

Cut the patchwork pieces

You can print the templates here and here.  The dark line is the sewing line and the outer dotted line is the cutting line.  I find it best to label each template with the fabric colour as well, just to avoid confusion as you cut the pieces.

Cut the yellow triangles

Cut the yellow triangles

From the yellow fabric cut 7.3/8″ strips of fabric across the width.  Lay the template on the fabric with the base of the triangle in line with the edge of the fabric.  Make two cuts for the sides of the triangle and then you just need to clip the corners.

If you line the base of the triangle with first the bottom and then the top of the fabric you can cut the maximum number of triangles from each strip of fabric.

Cut the large brown triangles

Cut the large brown triangles

For the brown large triangles use 3.5/8″ strips of brown fabric.  If you cut your templates from fabric folded in half, as it comes from the shop, you’ll find that you get both triangles from one template.

Cut the small triangles

Cut the small triangles

Finally for the small brown triangle I used 3.7/8″ strips of brown fabric because that’s what EQ7 suggested.  I think that I could probably have cut them from the same 3.5/8″ strips that I used for the larger triangles.

You need to cut sixteen of each template piece.

Add the small triangle

Add the small triangle

Make the tippecanoe quilt block

Sew the small triangle to the base of the yellow triangle.  Press with the seam alllowance away from the yellow.

Add the side triangles

Add the side triangles

Add the side triangles one at a time, pressing the first triangle open before adding the second.  The progression in the photo goes down the left hand side and then down the right hand side.

Trim the edges to straighten the sides.  The block now measures 6.1/2″ square and you need to make sixteen of these.

Cut 6.1/2″ squares of light, medium and dark blue.  You need eight light blue, six medium blue and six dark blue.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the tippecanoe quilt

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  Make the first row with a pair of tippecanoe blocks in the middle and one at each end.  Place light blue squares in the remaining two spaces.  Note the direction of the yellow triangles.  At each end of the row they point towards the corner of the quilt.  In the middle the first yellow triangle points to bottom left while the second one points to top right.

Row two

Row two

Rows two and five are both made with blue squares only.  Make row 2 with light, dark medium, dark, medium, light blue squares.  The layout for row five is slightly different:  light, medium dark, medium, dark light.

The idea is for the medium and dark blue squares to alternate around the central section.

Row three

Row three

Rows three and four contain the same blocks as each other.  In row three place a tippecanoe block at each end and two in the middle.  The yellow triangles point to top left in the first, third and sixth blocks.  In the fourth block it points to top right.  Place a medium blue square in second position and dark blue in the fifth.

Row four

Row four

Last three rows

Lay the same blocks out for the fourth row.  This time the yellow triangles point to bottom right in the first, fourth and sixth positions.  The triangle in the third position points to bottom left.  Place the dark blue square in the second position and the medium blue in fifth position.

Row six

Row six

Row six contains the same blocks as row one but the yellow triangles are placed in different directions.  At each end they point down towards the corners of the quilt.  In the middle pair the yellow triangle points first to bottom left and then to top right.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Finish the quilt

Sew the blocks together in rows and then sew the rows to each other.

For the border I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  You need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Tippecanoe quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Quilting on Minnie

Quilting on Minnie

Last week I mentioned that I had finally sorted out Minnie, my longarm quilting machine.  Well, I’ve begun quilting the Plaid quilt on her.  I can’t tell you how good it felt to finally get going.  Naturally, I was also hugely relieved that it went so well.

I had been very nervous that after the move I might have some of the problems with tension (mine and hers!) that I’d had when I first bought her, but it all went really smoothly.

I had picked up some pretty tartan fabric in the rag market and I’m using that for the backing.  It’s brushed cotton so it should make the quilt feel nice and warm to curl up in.

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Comments

  1. It’s interesting to see something slightly more complicated. Glad you managed to get Minnie going. I can never seem to get the tension right on my sewing machine, even after following careful instructions….may have to take it back to the shop to ask for a tutorial.

    • Hi June. Tension is probably a major problem to many quilters. Asking the shop for help is a great idea – I would offer to help, but you’re a long way away!

  2. Thanks for the pattern Rose. That long arm machine looks a monster!

  3. Colleen McKinlay says:

    Good morning Rose from sunny Vancouver Island. I am sitting outside our trailer right on the ocean watching four people having a lovely paddle in their canoes and I opened up your email with a canoe theme. Talk about deja vu😉. Beautiful design Rose. Good to know Minnie is up and running. So envious. Would love a Minnie. Have a wonderful weekend. We are off to visit a few local open air markets this weekend. Fresh strawberries and raspberries. Yum!
    Colleen

    • Oh Colleen – how idyllic it sounds. We have had rain most of the day so I am very envious. Enjoy the open air markets and fresh produce.

  4. HI Rose, You have come up with another interesting pattern.
    I will be hemming a pair of pants this afternoon and at the same time watching the British Open. It’s a shame that they have to play in cold and rainy weather. Here in USA it’s hot and humid.

    Good to read that all went well with MInnie. You’ll have to show us the end result.

    • Hi Claire. We do sometimes have sunshine in our summers. It’s not very evident at the moment, though. When my middle son played golf for his university I used to go and watch – and without fail ended up very wet and cold after following him round 36 holes! He even played at Muirfield, though, so I did get to see some lovely courses.

  5. Jo Williams says:

    I love this quilt pattern as I live in Indiana and county of Tippecanoe. I am very interested in making it. My problem is, I cannot print the templates and I don’t know the sizes. Can you help me in a way that I can make it.
    Thanks

    • Hi Jo. Draw a 6″ square. Mark the midpoint at 3″ on the top line and the right hand line. Join those two marks across the corner. Then draw a line from each mark to the bottom left hand corner. Cut those four sections out and then add the 1/4″ seam allowance all round each section before you use it as a template. Hope that helps.

  6. Sandra Barnett says:

    Oh Rose,
    Another great pattern. Will have to make this one also. I am heming the biding on the back of one of my quilts. will be finished with it tomorrow. Glad you are having fun around your town. We went blueberry picking on Wednesday. My husband is a fast picker. In one hour we got 12 pounds of blueberries. Came home and made blueberry muffins.
    Thank you for all the trouble you go to to bring me these patterns. Also glad that Minnie is being a good girl and doing her job well.
    Have a great weekend and Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Hi Sandra. That’s a lot of blueberries! I’ve been watching the local blackberries, greedily waiting for them to ripen. There’s something very satisfying about picking wild fruit, isn’t there.

  7. Hello Rose. This is a most interesting pattern and I shall have to put it near the top of my to-do list. I am reminded of bow ties by this pattern, but maybe my imagination is just a bit warped.

    I am so pleased that you are managing to visit and explore so many places and events now that you have moved. You certainly seem to have a new lease of life. Lucky you.

    Well done you for sorting Minnie out. I can see lots of patterns coming our way now. And I must say I am looking forward to them. Thank you in anticipation.

    all best Janny

    • Hi Janny. The triangles reminded me of wonky bow ties also. I was trying to keep the pairs of triangles off centre to add more interest to the quilt. Yes, I certainly am trying to get out and about a lot. I don’t want to have any regrets when I get too ancient to travel. I was so relieved that Minnie was still working fine after her move to Birmingham. I think that one of the reasons that it took me so long to get started with her again was that I was afraid I might have all sorts of problems.

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