Alaska Quilt Block – Free Pattern

Alaska quilt block

Alaska quilt block

The Alaska quilt block is quite a large one, but it has some interesting features.  I looked at it and decided that it would be easiest to make four quarters and then sew them together.  Wrong!!  I did that and found that the central area came out all wrong.  The block obviously isn’t completely symmetrical, so I’ve shown it in sections instead.

I’ve made it as a 24″ square finished size.  You could make it as a 16″ square if you used 2.1/2″ and 2.7/8″ squares.




Cutting requirements for the Alaska quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  four light blue, eight white

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four light blue

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four light blue

3.7/8″ squares:  eight each in dark blue/light blue, eight each in light blue/white, sixteen each in dark blue/white

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Make the central area of the Alaska quilt block

Central section

Central section

Begin with four dark blue/white half square triangles in the middle of the block.  Place these so that there are two larger dark blue triangles on the sides and two larger white triangles on the top and bottom.

Add two white squares on each edge of the central four patch.  Then add a dark blue/white half square triangle in each corner, forming the corners of this section.  It was these triangles which came out wrong when I tried to make this block in four quarters.

Add the outer frames

Bottom two rows

Bottom two rows

I’ve shown the bottom two rows of the block on their own first.  I thought that it would be clearer for you to see just the two rows first rather than the entire outer frames.

In the middle place two light blue/white half square triangles with two dark blue/white half square triangles beneath them.  On either side of the light blue triangles place a 9.1/2″ light blue rectangle.  Outside the dark blue triangles place a dark blue/light blue half square triangle on each side and then a 6.1/2″ light blue rectangle on each side.

Alaska quilt block full layout

Alaska quilt block full layout

This pattern is repeated on each edge of the central section.  If you place the top two rows next, then you will find that for the sides you only need to add four pairs of squares to each side.  Make sure that you always create a white diamond and two dark blue triangles on the edges of the block.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the Alaska quilt block.

Quilt design ideas

Basic Alaska quilt design

Basic Alaska quilt design

The basic quilt idea is made with nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

It is a pretty quilt, but I felt that the design of the block was rather lost.

Using white sashing

Using white sashing

So for the next version I used white sashing to separate the blocks.  I thought that this looked much better but it still didn’t feel quite right.

With blue sashing

With blue sashing

Then I changed the sashing to dark blue and this is definitely the one that I liked best.

Thanks for visiting my blog.  I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About Rose

Comments

  1. Cynthia Ash says:

    I like this best with the dark blue sashing too. It’s a beautiful quilt!

  2. Eve A Ward says:

    This is an amazing looking quilt. I personally am fond of the sashing (dark) in between the blocks. Yes, it makes the quilt bigger but its looks – WOW!!!!
    I am not sure how you come up with these different blocks as so many just copy the next person. You, you come up with your own or different blocks. GREAT JOB!!

    • Thanks, Eve. This one in particular is a traditional block. For copyright reasons I only use blocks that are traditional or that I have designed myself.

%d bloggers like this: