Pub Floor Tile Quilt Pattern

Pub floor tile quilt

Pub floor tile quilt

The design for the pub floor tile quilt pattern comes to you, of course, from the floor tiles in a pub that I visited recently.  They served a lovely red wine, so obviously it was a tough job researching this design to show you!

Floor tiles

Floor tiles

The quilt measures 78″ square.  I have used 1/2 yard each of grey and white fabrics, 1 yard each of black and blue with 1.3/4 yards of red and 2.1/2 yards of cream fabric.  I have tried to stay true to the colouring of the original floor tiles as far as possible.  The quilt blocks are 12″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the pub floor tile quilt

Central block:  four 3.1/2″ red squares, two 2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ cream rectangles, three 2.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ rectangles, two 2.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles

Corner blocks:  four 4.1/2″ cream squares, four 5.1/4″ black squares, four 5.1/4″ grey squares, eight 4.7/8″ grey squares, sixteen 3.3/8″ by 6.1/8″ white rectangles

For the rest of the quilt:

12.1/2″ by 44.1/2″:  four cream

12.1/2″ squares:  eight red

Black fabric:  twelve 12.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips, four 40.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips

2.1/2″ squares:  eight blue

For the borders you will need to cut eight 2.1/2″ strips of red and eight 3.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric.

Central block layout

Central block layout

Make the central quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown in the photo.  There are four red 3.1/2″ squares with an 8.1/2″ cream strip between them horizontally and two 3.1/2″ cream strips between them vertically.  At each side there’s an 8.1/2″ cream strip and at the top and bottom there’s a 12.1/2″ cream strip.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the red squares together in columns with the cream strips between them. Then you can sew the columns together across the central area.  Finally add the cream strips at the top and bottom.  You only need to make one of this block.

Central area of block

Central area of block

Make the diamond in a square

These are a little more complicated, but still easy if you take it in small steps.

Cut a 5.1/4″ black square along both diagonals to make four triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 4.1/2″ cream square.  Sew the triangles to the square on the top and bottom, press and then sew the remaining two triangles to the sides.  Press the triangles open and trim the middle of each edge where the fabric sticks out.

Make the central row of the block

Central row of the block

Central row of the block

Use this diamond in a square to form the central row of the block.  Place a white rectangle on each side with a grey triangle at each end of the row.  These triangles are made by cutting a 4.7/8″ square along one diagonal.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across the row.

Add the top section

Full layout of the corner block

Full layout of the corner block

The top section of the block is made in two rows.  Place a white triangle above the central row with a grey triangle on either side. These triangles are made by cutting a 5.1/4″ grey square along both diagonals to form four triangles.

Then above that row place a larger grey triangle (made from a 4.7/8″ square).  Note that the two smaller grey triangles are placed so that the right angled corner (the square corner) lie against the bottom of the white rectangle.

Complete the corner block

Add the top of the block first

Add the top of the block first

Sew these pieces together across the row and then sew them to the central row.

The bottom part of the block is very similar, but the smaller grey triangles are placed so that the square corners lie against the top of the white rectangle, rather than the bottom as they were in the top section.

Sew these two rows to the central row to complete the block.  You need to make four of these.

Assemble the central area

Layout for central area

Layout for central area

Having made the blocks, it is easy now to pull everything together.  Place the eight 12.1/2″ red squares around the central block.  Place two 12.1/2″ black strips between each pair of squares so that each row contains three blocks and two black strips.

Sew the blocks together across the rows.

Add sashing strips between the rows

Add sashing strips between the rows

In order to join the rows to each other, make two sashing strips of three black strips with two blue squares between them.  Now you can sew the rows together.

Add sashing around this area

Add sashing around this area

In order to complete the black sashing around the central area, sew a 40.1/2″ strip of black to the top and bottom.  Sew a blue square to both ends of the remaining two 40.1/2″ black strips and sew these to the sides.

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

This bit is really simple.  First sew a 40.1/2″ cream strip to the top and bottom.  Now sew a corner block to each end of the remaining two cream strips.  Sew these strips to the sides of the quilt.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 68.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

Finally add the second border of 3.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pub floor tile quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding – plenty of open spaces for quilting.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Sarehole Mill

Sarehole Mill

J R R Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, spent part of his childhood in Birmingham. The other day (when I was lost), I happened upon a sign for Sarehole Mill.  Tolkien and his brother used to play in and around the mill.

It was too late in the day for me to visit the inside of the mill, but I was able to wander around the outside and it’s definitely somewhere I will return to.

Sarehole mill pond

Sarehole mill pond

It’s such a calm place – an oasis of quiet set within some quite busy roads.  I see that there is a Tolkien trail around Birmingham, so that’s a must for the summer.

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Comments

  1. Haha! I’m amazed that you have actually created a quilt inspired by tiles on the floor of a pub. I prefer it as a quilt, not sure I’d like a tiled floor like that.

    Perhaps J.R. Tolkien was imagining some of his magical scenes even as a young lad. Very interesting Rosemary, thanks for telling us of your travels.

    • Thanks, June. Actually in the pub those tiles were totally appropriate – but as you say they wouldn’t transfer to a house. I’m looking forward to doing the Tolkien trail in the summer.

  2. Dear Rose – who would ever have thought that inspiration would come from a pub floor! I expect it meant that you had to stay a little longer and sip a bit more red to ensure you had the pattern copied correctly.

    I have now at last cut some triangles and completed several of the flying kite squares. I have tried, within the contents of my stash, to keep them colour co-ordinated. They look as though they will make good table mats and several joined together will make a table runner. Good for presents I hope.

    Hope your tooth is not giving you any pain. Such a traumatic event I always think.

    Take care and best wishes Janny

    • Hi Janny. Yes, I did need a second glass. It’s a tough job, but someone’s got to do it! Those table mats sound lovely. They would certainly make great gifts. You must be so happy to be back to sewing again. Tooth’s fine, thanks – did me good to cut down on eating for a bit.

  3. Hi Rose, I love this tale on your pub adventure.
    the quilt pattern is rather unique as well as a bit busy for me. you did a great job recreating the design tho. Hope you have a wonderful weekend.

    • Thanks, Linda. I was afraid that I’d enlarged the pattern too much, but the alternative was to have tiny patchwork in the corner blocks.

  4. Rose you did a great job making the quilt.

  5. Love your ‘Pub Floor Tile Quilt Pattern’ and your research idea, mines usually behind the screen of a laptop although for my jewellery making & dressmaking, I can be inspired by what I see in the ‘world’ around me so I understand your thinking, although I must get out more to see more of the world and pubs around me 😉 Continue To Always StayCreative As It Inspires & Helps Me! 🙂

    • Thanks, Debra. I was a bit tongue in cheek with the ‘research’ idea. Actually it was just a pub that we popped into to get warm after a pleasant but chilly walk. It’s lovely how many design ideas are floating around us, though.

  6. Chris Storzbach says:

    I appreciate you going the extra glass of wine for us! We here in Western Oregon have just gone through 12 days of snow, ice, freezing rain, high winds and now flooding. Many of us have been stuck in our homes due to extremely bad road conditions. You know the roads are bad when several snowplows turnover and sanding trucks get stuck. This is very unusual weather for our part of the state, but it did give an opportunity to do a lot of quilting.

    • Hi Chris. So sorry to hear about your weather – I feel a bit embarrassed to think that I’ve been moaning just because our weather’s been a bit grey and miserable. Glad you were able to stay in the warm and get plenty of quilting done.

  7. Char Rathman says:

    Just a note to say, I really do not comment much, but love this pattern, and all of the others that I have saved on my own drive…..the videos teach so much….THANK YOU

    Char Rathman
    Chetek, Wi USA

  8. Rose, The lengths you go to -to bring us such lovely and doable patterns.
    The photos are lovely. Thank you!.
    I think it’s great when people are willing to explore their locality.
    Hope you didn’t have too much discomfort after the visit dentist.
    Enjoy London.

    • Hi Mary. Thanks for your comments. I love exploring – there are so many lovely places to visit around here. Being able to share my experiences is an added bonus. The dentist was really impressive – he had the tooth out before I’d realised he was starting work. I’m certainly glad that I found him.

  9. That will be quite an adventure, Love the quilt!

  10. You are such a talented lady. I was wondering how you would figure out a way to make the corner block because it looked so complicated. Turns out that you made it look easy and very doable.

    Thanks again for sending photos of Sarehole Mill. I looked up J.J.J. Tolkien – read his biography and bibliography and found it all very interesting.

    • Hi Claire. I rather like that corner block so may well use it again in quilts. I read Lord of the Rings when I was a kid – I was afraid to go and see the films in case they had imagined the characters differently from the way that I’d imagined them. I hadn’t realised that Tolkien had Birmingham connections until I moved here.

  11. Sandra Barnett says:

    Oh Rose,
    you never know when inspiritation will come from. Love the quilt and the way you explain it it will be easy enough. Have not been feeling too well Medication went for a flop back on other meds it will take time to get strength back up. Tried sewing but it only lasted about 30 minutes. Would like to make this quilt soon. Thank you for telling us about your adventures. Lovely town you live in.
    Have a great weekend and Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Hi Sandra. Sorry to hear that you’ve not been well. I know that I would miss sewing dreadfully if I had to give it up for a while. I hope you feel better soon.

  12. Amazing where you can look for a pattern! Really makes you think. Hope you are well, and look forward to seeing many patterns and making me think! Have a good weekend

    • Hi Margaret. I’m always subconsciously looking for quilt ideas. If you see anything that you think would make up into a quilt I’d love to see a photo.

  13. Hi Rose – lovely pattern – love your choice of colours – works well together. You will be visiting a few more pubs now eh! (Any excuse!) ha! If you need some more inspiration go to Alhambra Palace Granada – wow ! The patterns you could find will blow your mind Rose – be prepared to spend a whole day there at least. I just loved it – happy sewing.😜

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