Vegetable Patch Quilt Pattern

Vegetable patch quilt in red

Vegetable patch quilt in red

Vegetable patch quilt in blue

Vegetable patch quilt in blue

The Vegetable Patch quilt is one that I designed for Fabric Freedom to showcase that range of their fabrics.  It’s a delightful range, with quirky designs on fresh and modern colours.   There are three colour options and I’m showing you the instructions for the blue quilt here, but offering the kits in both blue or red for this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the vegetable patch quilt

Rabbit fabric:  nine 6.1/2″ squares, sixteen 2.1/2″ squares

Daisy fabric:  six 6.7/8″ squares, two 7.1/4″ squares

Cloud fabric:  two 6.7/8″ squares, one 7.1/4″ square, two 2.1/2″ lengths of 38.1/2″, two 2.1/2″ lengths of 42.1/2″

Nestbox fabric:  four 6.7/8″ squares, one 7.1/4″ square

Checked fabric:  forty rectangles 2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the vegetable patch quilt

Make half square triangles with the 6.7/8″ squares.  Place a daisy square right sides together with either a cloud or a nestbox square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ squares.

Make quarter square triangle units

Make quarter square triangle units

In order to make the quarter square triangle units, cut all the 7.1/4″ squares along both diagonals to make four triangles from each square.

Sew the triangles in pairs

Sew the triangles in pairs

Place two daisy triangles together with a nestbox and a cloud triangle to form a square.  Note that the two daisy triangles are opposite each other and the nestbox and cloud triangles are opposite each other.

Sew the triangles together in pairs and then sew the pairs together.  You need four of these.

Assembling the vegetable patch quilt

Layout without sashing

Layout without sashing

I’m showing you the layout here without the sashing because I think it’s clearer for you to see how the squares are arranged – and also because they fit on my display board better.

There’s a rabbit fabric square in each corner and five of them arranged in a cross in the middle of the quilt.  The quarter square triangles are placed in the middle of each edge, with the nestbox triangle always on the outside edge of the quilt.  The four daisy/cloud half square triangles are placed around the central cross with the cloud triangle nearest the cross.  There are two daisy/nestbox half square triangles along each edge.  These are placed so that the nestbox triangle is on the outside.

First three rows

First three rows

Add the sashing strips to the layout before you begin to sew everything together.  There are four sashing strips in the checked fabric between each pair of squares.  There are no sashing strips at either end of the rows.

Rows 4 and 5

Rows 4 and 5

Sew the squares and sashing strips together across each row.

I have a confession to make here – because I’d laid the rows out as you see in the photos, I happily began to sew the rows to each other without any sashing between the rows.  What a lot of unpicking I had to do!

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

So, don’t forget the sashing between the rows!  These are made using five sashing strips with four cornerstone squares in rabbit fabric.  You need to make four of these rows so that you can sew one between each row, but not at the top above row one or at the bottom below row five.

You now have nine rows including the sashing rows.  Sew the rows to each other, taking care to match the cornerstone squares in the sashing rows with the sashing strips above and below them.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Finally for the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of the cloud fabric.  Sew the 38.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom and the 42.1/2″ lengths to the sides.

Quilting in the central square

Quilting in the central square

That completes the vegetable patch quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Unusually for me, I have already completed the quilting (many times!).  I have left the marker lines in so that you can see more clearly what I have done.  I was trying to emphasis the overall design by following the diamonds created within the design.  In the central square I marked the midpoint of each edge of the square and then joined these points to make a diamond shape.  I quilted this with two lines of straight line quilting about 1/4″ to 1/2″ apart.

Quilting across the corner squares

Quilting across the corner squares

I continued this theme by putting double lines of quilting to follow first the cloud diamond and then the daisy diamond.  Finally I quilted double lines across the corner squares.  You may prefer a different quilting design altogether, but that’s the one that I chose – it’s simple to do and helps the quilt design.

Last week I complained about the weather and this week the weather has been stunning – it’s been a real delight to get out in the garden and feel the warmth!

Here’s the video:

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Comments

  1. Oh my goodness! These are SO pretty Rosemary. Well done for making so many. It’s good to know that I’m not the only one who has to unpick things. Gorgeous work!

    • Thanks, June. Oh I always have my seam ripper close at hand – never know when it will be needed. I do like the quilts – even if I have made more of them than I would have liked.

  2. Gwendy Burtz says:

    This is really eye catching!!! Very nice pattern. Thanks so much for sharing. You are very encouraging. Quilting is such a stress reliever for me.

    • Hi Gwendy. Quilting is officially recognised as being therapeutic – I know I get all tetchy if I can’t get to my sewing machine for any length of time.

  3. Hi Rose — hope all is well with you and your’s “across the pond!” LOVE this! Thank you!

  4. Hi Rose
    This is my first comment, that’s not to say I don’t like your previous quilts!! they are all lovely.

    I just had to comment on this one it is so lovely, you really are one very clever lady! I will definitely have a go at making my own “vegetable patch” I am quite new to quilting, my triangles sometimes being a bit hit and miss but hopefully my triangle veg will pass the test and end up looking good enough to eat!!😉

    Have a good weekend.

    • Hi Gill. Thanks for commenting. I’m so glad that you like the quilt. You’ve probably noticed that my triangles are often missing their points – if I was making quilts for a show it would be different, but when you’re quilting for yourself I think that the sheer pleasure of making a quilt is the most important thing. I’m sure that your vegetable patch quilt will look good and tasty!

  5. Another beautiful quilt. I keep thinking about all the blades you must use when you do so much cutting. It’s brutally hot now in the entire United States. Temperatures in some places are as high as 105 degrees. Here in CT it’s 93.4° F. and the prediction is for the temperatures to remain this high until Wednesday. Ugh!

    • Hi Claire. I’ve certainly used a few recently. I also had to change my cutting mat earlier this week – amazing how much easier cutting was on a new mat! Our temperatures have soared this last week, but not to anything like the temperatures that you are getting. I would definitely wilt if I was over there.

  6. Thank you Rose for taking the time to write up this lovely pattern.
    Hope you have a nice week-end and that the weather remains summery.

  7. Hi, Rose,
    The Vegetable Patch pattern is definitely a winner!! Especially the blue one!! (yes, indeed, blue is my favorite color!)
    I’m just wondering though — what would it look like in the 1930’s style of fabrics? The fabrics you used are all very cute but I do love the 1930’s novelty prints!! Even in the reproductions they have begun to lean more to the florals, so that makes the novelty prints Even harder to find. 🙁

    The weather here in Texas is awfully hot as are having 100+ temps here daily — truthfully I stay in the air conditioning unless I absolutely have to go out!!
    Stay cool, Rose and everyone else!!

  8. HI Rose, I love, love, love this pattern. This is so darn cute! Very refreshing, looks like a table topper I’m definitely going to make. Our weather is in the low 90’s. Way to hot to be in the garden but perfect for being in the sewing room. Have a great weekend Rose.

    • Thanks, Linda. I think the fabrics help with that refreshing look. I just love this weather – it’s what I grew up with in Zambia.

  9. Wow the quilts are so cute. Thanks for the quilt pattern Rose

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