Stained Glass Quilt Tutorial – Pansy

Stained glass quilt tutorial

Stained glass quilt tutorial

For this stained glass quilt tutorial I have used a simple pansy template.  Many stained glass quilt patterns have Christmas as a theme, so I decided to make something different, suitable for any time of year.  I’ve used two pansy blocks with black Clover bias tape around the petals and then I’ve used 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric in the borders to continue the stained glass theme.

There are many ways of producing the stained glass effect, and this method is probably the most common.  I try to find templates that have smooth curves as they are easier to use.  This pansy template comes from EQ7.  The pansy quilted wall hanging measures just over 17″ wide and about 30″ long.

Cutting requirements for the stained glass quilt tutorial

White fabric:  two 12″ squares

Pansy fabrics:  scraps in three different colours – I’ve used purple, blue and yellow/green

Black fabric:  1.1/2″ strips:  three 12″ long, two 26.1/2″ long to border the pansy blocks.  Two 16″ long and two 30.1/2″ long for the border.  Two small circles for the middle of the pansies.

Coloured fabric for the border:  1.1/2″ strips: two 14″ long and two 28.1/2″ long

Backing and wadding:  rectangles 17″ by 32″

Make two copies of the template

Make two copies of the template

Making the pansy stained glass quilt blocks

Print two copies of the pansy template which you can find by clicking here.  You’ll need one of them left whole and one cut into petals.  Number them, starting with number 1 in the bottom right petal and working clockwise with the numbering.

Place the first template (of the whole pansy) under one of the white squares and draw the shape onto the fabric.  Repeat with the second white square.  I have drawn these shapes on the right side of the fabric.

Cut the petals in fabric

Cut the petals in fabric

Use the individual petal templates to cut the shapes in fabric.  Cut two of each template and make sure that you keep them all separate so that you can keep track of which number each shape is.

Place the petals on the pansy template

Place the petals on the pansy template

Begin placing the petals on each white square.  The edges should just lay next to each other.  Pin in place.

Begin placing the tape on petal one

Begin placing the tape on petal one

Fuse the tape to the fabric

Fuse the tape to the fabric

The Clover bias tape is adhesive on one side and can be fused on to the fabric using an iron.  Begin laying the tape across the top of petal number one, easing it to follow the curves.  Using the tip of your iron (and watch out for your fingers!) press the tape in place as you lay it.

Begin to tape petal two

Begin to tape petal two

Finish with the blue petal

Finish with the blue petal

Cut the tape at the end of the top of petal one, and begin again in the middle of the pansy to lay tape up one side and across the top of petal two.  As you can see, the tape for petal two will cover the end of the tape for petal one, making the whole stained glass quilt neater.  This is why we work methodically around the petals, finishing with the blue petal on the right side.  For this petal the tape begins and ends at the middle, so the ends of the tape on the petals on either side of it are covered.

For the middle of the stained glass pansy I didn’t trust myself to make a neat circle using tape as it’s such a small shape, so instead I cut a small black circle in black fabric.  After backing this with fusible interfacing I could press it in the middle of the pansy, covering all the ends of the tape from the petals.

Sew the blocks together with black strips

Sew the blocks together with black strips

Assembling the parts of the stained glass quilt tutorial

Sew the two pansy stained glass quilt blocks to each other using 12″ black fabric strips and sew a 26.1/2″ black strip to either side.

Add the borders

Add the borders

Use 1.1/2″ strips of coloured fabric for the first border – sew the two short strips to the top and bottom and the two longer strips to the sides.  Finally for the last border use 1.1/2″ black strips again – two 16″ strips for the top and bottom and two 30.1/2″ strips for the sides.

Layer the stained glass patchwork

Layer the stained glass patchwork

Leave a gap in the stitching

Leave a gap in the stitching

Lay the wadding on the work surface and lay the backing fabric on top with right side up.  Lay the stained glass patchwork on top with right side down.  Pin.  Using a 1/4″ seam, sew around three and a half sides of the stained glass patchwork to secure the three layers together.  Leave one half of one of the short edges open so that you create a gap through which to turn everything right side out.  When you have turned it all right side out, turn under a small hem across the gap and slipstitch in place.  Press well on both sides.

Quilting the stained glass quilt wall hanging

Quilting showing on the back

Quilting showing on the back

For this stained glass quilt tutorial I have left sewing the black tape in place until the final stage when I was doing the quilting.  I did this because I had hoped that the petals would stand out more if the tape was sewn down through the wadding and backing.  In fact I wouldn’t say that this is really noticeable, so in it wouldn’t have made any difference if I had sewn the tape as soon as I had finished the blocks.  Aah, hindsight is a wonderful thing.

The traditional way of securing the tape in stained glass quilt tutorials is to sew two lines of stitching, one on each side of the tape.  I find that this is quite time consuming and my lines are never that accurate so I use a zigzag stitch instead.  This means that I am still stitching on both sides of the tape so should still be securing the fabric on each side of the tape.

Echo quilting around the pansy

Echo quilting around the pansy

You’ll need to use a walking foot and black thread to do this stitching.  You can see in the photo that some of the zigzag lines look darker than others.  This is because I had to stitch along some lines twice in order to cover all the edges once to secure all the tape in place without having to keep stopping, moving the needle and starting again.  When the pansies were secure I stitched in straight lines along each edge of the black fabric border strips.

After this I changed to white thread and stitched two lines of echo quilting around the pansies just to emphasis them better.

Here’s the video:

The base for my sewing shed

The base for my sewing shed

Last week I had the concrete base laid for my girl-shed where I’m planning to set up Minnie, my longarm quilting machine.  You can see a photo of where the shed will go and then in a few weeks’ time I’ll be able to show you the shed itself.  As you can see, I have quite a narrow garden.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About Rose

Comments

  1. Such a gorgeous flower and the black just makes it POP!!! Adding to my never-ending to do list.

    Thank you Rose.
    Regards,
    Helen
    ps dying to see Minnie in action xx

    • Thanks, Helen. Black really does make colours stand out, doesn’t it – seems to work particularly well with batiks.

  2. Thank you Rose – another beautiful project to do!! So glad that you are settling in so well to your new home. The heat here in South Africa – in the town where I live has been stifling with no rain in sight. My garden looks like a “middle of winter” garden! Water is indeed a precious commodity in this part. Have a great weekend.

    • Thanks, Monica. I was brought up in Zambia and I have childhood memories of the rains always starting on November 5th – Guy Fawkes night – when we wanted to be outside with fireworks. I hope your rains begin soon.

  3. I love this stained glass. Well done. Went to Ludlow today, had lunch at the Green Park cafe. No salmon swimming upstream, which was disappointing!

    • Hi Jan. I was wondering about the salmon jumping – there was an item on the news last night about it. What a shame you didn’t see them. Still the setting at the Green Cafe is lovely even without the salmon to watch.

  4. Hi Rose,

    Beautiful wall hanging. You keep coming up with winners. Great instructions.

    Wish I had your back yard. I have a patio that faces my neighbor’s dining room. Absolutely no privacy. Can’t wait to see your shed.

    • Hi Claire. I’ve been really lucky with both this house and my house in Ludlow in terms of privacy. I’m sure my neighbours could watch me in the garden from their upstairs – but I feel sure that they wouldn’t want to!

  5. This is definitely on my “to do list”, once I’ve finished all the projects in hand| We have LOTS of rain this week in West of Scotland but mild too and that’s the forecast for next few days so good chance to catch up on the sewing.

    • Thanks, Irene. I’ve just finished some echo quilting on the pansies and it definitely does them good. I’ll try and add a photo to the pattern tomorrow. We seem to have had very heavy rain as well, but I think it’s been worse in Scotland.

  6. Jayne Wilson says:

    Love this Rose. Thank you.

  7. Linda Dickson says:

    I love that you show us your home and tell about the happenings there. I enjoy that as much as all the new quilt ideas.

    • Thanks, Linda. I’m never sure if other people will be interested in my life apart from quilting, so it’s nice to get the feedback.

  8. Hi Rose. Hope your day is going great. I love stain glass quilting. Just finished up the latest great grand child’s Christmas stocking. I don’t do mine like yours but I am definitely going to incorporate your pattern into my style. I look forward to more of your patterns, stain glass or otherwise. Have an awesome weekend. Get out and enjoy your family.

    • Thanks, Gail. Glad you like the stained glass quilt pattern – it’s a very easy way of giving something extra to a project.

  9. Love stain glass this will be good year round.Love to here about my old stamping grounds.

    • Thanks, Sue. I think the German Christmas Market opens in New Street next week, so I’ll try and post photos of that soon.

  10. Rose Johnson says:

    Thanks Rose for another Beautiful project. This would look good as a table runner as well.
    It has been raining a lot here in Victoria, Australia. It is Spring here
    and it is Racing carnival time so it usually rains.
    I enjoyed reading about your personal life as well,
    Thanks for your projects.
    Rose Johnson.

    • Thanks, Rose. You’re right – it would make an eyecatching table runner. The Melbourne Cup made the news over here, with a female jockey winning it. Shame about the rain – we’ver certainly had some very heavy rain here.

  11. Debbie Calvert says:

    Once again another amazing quilt love the design the colours and the tutorial. Rose you’re one lovely lady.

  12. breda buggy says:

    Where do u get the black tape from hard to get anything in Ireland wats it called love your classes breda

  13. Barbara murphy says:

    What a lovely easy project, it’s gorgeous

    • Thanks, Barbara. I thought it would be a simple introduction for those who haven’t tried stained glass quilting before.

  14. Rose, Thank you for making clear how a stained glass effect
    is achieved in quilting. This would be lovely in Christmas colours..
    Glad things are moving ahead with “your girl shed”.

  15. Hi Rose,This is beautiful,and a wonderful project for us ladies that can’t manage the larger quilts,Thank You so much

    • Thanks, Carole. I’m glad you found it helpful – I’ve got lots of odd bits of walls where I like to hang small projects like this.

%d bloggers like this: