Spinning Tops Quilt Pattern

 

Spinning tops quilt pattern

Spinning tops quilt pattern

The spinning tops quilt pattern actually includes both the spinning tops quilt block and the corn and beans quilt block.  They are similar enough to go together beautifully but different enough to make quite an eyecatching quilt design.  Last time I went to the Fabric Freedom warehouse I was lucky enough to find some more of my favourite two fabrics from the Blossom range, so I was delighted to be able to use them together in this quilt.  I just love the way that turquoise diamond forms within the quilt.  As ever, you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

The quilt measures 55″ square and is made with nine blocks which are 15″ square finished size.  I have used 3/4 yard of the blue fabric, with 1.1/4 yards each of the turquoise and white fabrics.

Spinning tops quilt block

Spinning tops quilt block

Cutting requirements – spinning tops quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty five blue, sixty white

3.7/8″ squares:  ten blue, ten white

Corn and beans quilt block

Corn and beans quilt block

Cutting requirements – corn and beans quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty turquoise, thirty two white

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty four turquoise, twenty four white

For the spinning tops quilt borders you will need to cut five 1.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric and eleven 2.1/2″ strips of turquoise across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the spinning tops quilt block

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a blue and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowance towards the blue and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.  You’ll also need to make these in turquoise and white for the corn and beans quilt block.

Spinning tops quilt block layout

Spinning tops quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  The 3.1/2″ blue squares are placed along both diagonals.  On two of the corners there’s a half square triangle placed either side of the corner squares, forming a larger blue triangle just inside these corners.  The rest of the spaces are white squares.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the spinning tops quilt block.  You will need to make five of these.

Corn and beans quilt block layout

Corn and beans quilt block layout

Making the corn and beans quilt block

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  There’s a turquoise square in the middle with another one on each corner of the central square.  The half square triangles are placed in each corner, with one either side of each corner to form a larger turquoise triangle just inside all four corners.  The white squares are placed in pairs along the central vertical and the central horizontal line.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the corn and beans quilt block.  You will need to make four of these.

Rows 1 and 3 of the spinning tops quilt

Rows 1 and 3 of the spinning tops quilt

Assembling the spinning tops quilt

The blocks are laid out in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other – a stepping stones quilt block on each end with a corn and beans quilt block in the middle.

Row 2 of the spinning tops quilt

Row 2 of the spinning tops quilt

Row 2 is the opposite:  a corn and beans quilt block on each end with a spinning tops quilt block in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.

Adding the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

I’ve used three borders to give a frame to the quilt.  The first border is made using 2.1/2″ strips of turquoise fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used 1.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  You’ll need to cut two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of turquoise.  You’ll need two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the spinning tops quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section, towards the bottom of the page.

Here’s the video:

Yesterday I went to the Malvern Spring quilt show.  The quilts were lovely – lots of applique and baltimore album quilts, but there were signs everywhere saying that no photos could be published on the internet, so I’m afraid that I can’t show you any of them.  I bought some dress fabric which I’m really pleased with, so you’ll be seeing that when I start using it up.

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Comments

  1. Pat in Ohio says:

    I love this pattern. It doesn’t look too difficult yet the result is dramatic. Thank you, Rose for another beautiful pattern.

    • Thanks, Pat. You’re right – it’s not difficult – the two blocks are very similar to each other in construction.

  2. Trish Tarbuck says:

    Hi Rose, really like this quilt but I like the cup more ha ha! I am going to Malvern show on Sunday. Have wanted to go for years hope it’s worth the distance we have to travel.

    • Hi Trish. I’m sure you’ll have a wonderful time. It’s obviously not as big as the Festival of Quilts, but I really enjoyed the quilts on show – they were so pretty.

  3. Sheila Lymn says:

    Hi Rose ,many years ago I took part in an International Ranger Guide camp in Malvern and like this quilt it was magical ,brought back lots of memories thank you ,another one to save in” your file.”
    love and hugs Great Grandma Sheila xx

    • Hi Sheila. I was going to take a walk in the Malvern hills on my way home, but it was raining really hard so I gave up on that idea.

  4. Love the pattern!

  5. Rose, When I looked at the quilt I thought it was one of those split patches
    pattern that seems hard to sew properly (for me) but thankfully not.
    I love the chain effect achieved by the navy floral.
    As I asked for help concerning the fabric dye/bleed I want to say thanks
    for the advice from Claire.
    Thank you Rose for the pattern and for your help.

    • Hi Mary. I think that they are quite easy quilt blocks – and fairly similar to each other. I’m glad Claire’s advice helped – it must have been so disappointing for you to have the colour bleed in your quilt.

  6. Hi Rose,
    You did it again. Another beautiful quilt. I really like it.
    I’m through with making matching dresses and shoes for my great niece and her doll. I quit because the dress I made turned out looking more like a potato sack. My niece was happy when I told her that I was calling it quits. It’s time to get back to backing the rail fence quilt and the baby quilt. When I’m finished I will look to choosing one of your many beautiful quilts to make.
    I was glad to hear that my advise helped Mary. I hope it worked as well for her as it did for me.

    • Hi Claire. I think you’re a marvel making dresses and shoes for dolls – that must be such fiddly work. I bought some dress fabric last week to make a dress for my son’t wedding, but I’m not sure what pattern to use for it – and not sure if my dressmaking skills are good enough. Mary said that her quilt improved a lot with your help.

  7. linda legge says:

    Hi Rose. I have never commented before on your blog however I do read them every week. I really like this quilt and I am looking for some inspiration to make my friends daughter a quilt for a wedding present. I wanted to incorporate a double wedding ring block in the quilt but I don’t want to do all of it in the same block. So I have to plan it. I went to Malvern yesterday. As you say there were some brilliant quilts I don’t think I will ever reach their standards but I still love making them. I go to a quilters club and I have met some really lovely ladies who are only to happy to help me and if course you can’t go to a quilters club unless you don’t have a cup of tea and a piece of cake. Look forward to your next blog. Linda

    • Hi Linda. Good luck with the quilt – it sounds amazing. I’m sure you’ll find plenty of inspiration at quilt shows – I look at the quilts there with great envy, but often it’s enough that you can take inspiration from just some aspect of a quilt.

  8. lee marshall says:

    Hi Rose
    I was at the show on Friday and Saturday and thoroughly enjoyed it. Weren1t the quilts lovely!!!
    I intended to visit your shop on Monday as we drove past Ludlow, but due to one thing and another we were late starting out. As it was we only just made the boat. Living here on the Isle of Man I do miss some things about the UK( like getting to Quilt shows easily) but I sure don’t miss the traffic!! it’s horrendous!
    I really like this Block and think it would be very effective in the bright colours that I love. I have difficulty with the Maths of 3/78 etc. so would it make any difference if I rounded everything up to 4″ except for the overall size. I have difficulty cutting with a normal ruler so I use the June Taylor Shape cut Plus which is slotted in 1/2″.
    Please keep putting your Block on the web. Ilove your ideas.
    Lee

    • Hi Lee. That was quite a long trek that you took to get to Malvern. The quilts were good, though, weren’t they. I don’t have a physical shop – just do it all online. Normally you would have been welcome here anyway, but I was away from home on Monday. You could round the squares up to 4″ if you were using half square triangles only. If you have a mixture of hst’s and plain squares, you’d end up with seams not matching up. One alternative might be to use the 4″ squares, but trim the hst to 3.1/2″ square before you use it in a block.

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