Double Windmill Quilt Block

 

Double windmill quilt block

Double windmill quilt block

The double windmill quilt block is a four patch block which is attributed to Nancy Cabot.  It’s a lovely simple block and would look great in a quilt as I assume it will create a grid across the quilt.

Cutting requirements for the double windmill quilt block

6.1/2″ square:  one light blue

3.7/8″ squares:  two each in dark blue and light blue, two each in light blue and white, two each in dark blue and white

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the double windmill quilt block

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark fabric and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Double windmill quilt block layout

Double windmill quilt block layout

Lay the patchwork out in what would be four rows of four if you count the central square as four squares.  The 6.1/2″ square obviously goes in the middle.  In each corner there is a dark blue/light blue half square triangle.  Between each corner there are a light blue/white and a dark blue/white half square triangle.  These are placed so that the light blue triangles always combine to form a larger triangle, while the dark blue and the white triangles always combine to form a stripe.

Make three columns

Make three columns

Sew the two squares above and below the central square to each other and then sew them to the large square to create one column

Sew the four squares down each side to form two columns.  Sew the columns to each other to complete the double windmill quilt block.

Double windmill quilt image

Double windmill quilt image

Here’s a digital image of a quilt using just the double windmill quilt block.  As I had hoped, it forms a lovely grid across the quilt – but also some other lovely secondary designs.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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Comments

  1. Elizabeth says:

    ONE BLOCK BY IT SELF DOESN’T LOOK VERY INTERESTING BUT ALL TOGETHER MAKES A LOVELY QUILT. THANK YOU FOR THE PATTERN AND THE INSTRUCTIONS. HAVE A GOOD DAY.

  2. Dear Rose – Thank you for this one. I shall have to have a go. I think my concern about triangles is due to the fact that I am not very confident when sewing. As you say, if I have a go at one block . . . . . . . . . then maybe I can do more.

    Hope the decorating is going well. Not too tiring or strenuous.

    all best Janny

    • Hi Janny. I loved the card you sent – beautiful photo. I just wish I was better at decorating – I seem to leave a lot of smudges everywhere! Yes, I think that with triangles (as with so much else in life), practice is the key.

      • Dear Rose – Very glad you like it. I made that image from cut and fused glass and after firing used a special glue to bond onto a mirror. I hope it gives the feeling of quiet reflectiveness and waiting without moving. I hope that doesn’t sound too pretentious.

        all best Janny

  3. I love the way you break down projects into “chewable” pieces. 🙂 Thank you.

  4. Lesley Elliott says:

    Hi Rose
    i have so enjoyed reading your site and learned a lot. Do you still do a newsletter? I can’t find a sign up link. (or maybe I’m having a senior moment!). Thanks
    Lesley

    • Hi Lesley. Yes, I still send out an email every Friday. The signup is a blue box at the top of the right hand column on every page. Let me know if you have any problems signing up.

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