Retro Road Trip Quilt Pattern

 

Retro road trip quilt

Retro road trip quilt

The retro road trip quilt doesn’t qualify as a beginner quilt but I think that it shows something that you can put with chevrons so I thought that I’d run through the basics of how I made it.  It’s one of my designs for Fabric Freedom to showcase their delightful Retro Road Trip quilt fabric and I can’t give as much detail in their patterns as I do in patterns here on the website.

There are two basic quilt blocks – one for the interlocking chevrons and one for the diamonds.  The colours and fabrics vary in the rows, but the blocks are the same.

Cut squares along one or both diagonals

Cut squares along one or both diagonals

Making quarter square triangles

The half square triangles are made in the usual way with 3.7/8″ squares.  The quarter square triangles are made using both 3.7/8″ (cut along one diagonal) and 4.1/4″ squares (cut along both diagonals.

Fabrics vary for these squares

Fabrics vary for these squares

Each quarter square triangle unit is made with one larger triangle and two smaller triangles.  You need various different combinations of fabrics to make these, so the safest thing is to check the photo for the quilt blocks as you make them.

Retro road quilt block one layout

Retro road quilt block one layout

Retro road trip quilt block one

Both the blocks are rectangular rather than square – three squares across and four squares down.

The first column has a white square at each end and two quarter square triangles in the middle – these are the same as each other, just rotated to continue the lines of the chevrons.  The second and third columns are made with half square triangles in two different fabric combinations.

Retro road quilt block two

Retro road quilt block two

Retro road trip quilt block two

The second block is similar, but forms a diamond rather than chevrons.  The first column again has two white squares at the ends and two quarter square triangle units in the middle.  These are not the same as each other – the two smaller triangles are placed differently in each quarter square triangle.  The remaining two columns each contain two half square triangles and two squares.

Add an extra column at the end

Add an extra column at the end

Completing the quilt rows

When I began designing this quilt, I was convinced that I just had to make square blocks (four by four) and sew them together.  It took me ages to work out that in fact the repetition comes after three columns rather than four.

Retro road quilt layout

Retro road quilt layout

However, what I did need to do to give some symmetry to the quilt was to add an extra column at the end of the row.  You need to make an extra column one for each row and add it on to the end of the row.

You can see the quilt layout for a sample size quilt on the left.  The layout for the full size quilt would be the same but just with more blocks in each row.  In order to separate the rows from each other, I have put alternating 3.1/2″ squares in a row to act as sashing.

Add the quilt binding

Add the quilt binding

Add the quilt binding

Finally cut 3.1/2″ strips of a different fabric for the binding.

You can find the pattern for the full size quilt on the Fabric Freedom project page.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

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Comments

  1. Hi Rose,
    What a lovely design you have done again and I love the fabrics — Well done Rose,
    Jean

  2. Hi there Rose – Ye gods this is a complicated one. I’ve put it in my ‘to do one day’ file but think it might have to wait a while. Might have to wait until I retire and have a bit more time. It looks intriguing though. Thank you for making me more ambitious than I thought I could be.

    Over Christmas I even promised to make a cushion cover for a young friend and his girl friend. That is something I will have to get on with, and soon.

    Thank you again for everything. All best. Janny

    • Hi Janny. You can see why I couldn’t use it as a Friday emailed pattern. The idea seemed quite simple when I thought about it, but of course when I came to make it I realised that the quarter square triangles made it seem quite difficult – the rest of the pattern is easy! Good luck with the cushion cover.

      • Dear Rose – thanks for your encouragement. I had thought of using your peacock pattern but I need to source some butterfly printed material first as she is very keen on butterflies. They have a very old cottage and I need to get the colours to fit in with what they already have.

        all best Janny

  3. Dear Rose – I do hope your bridal shower went well. I’m not sure what it is but I’m wiling to bet you had a good time.

    Thank you also for suggesting I choose some of your fabrics for my butterfly project. Maybe I’ll not make a cushion but follow your peacock design and make it larger I have a small problem in that I’m not sure how true the colours are. I have chosen a butterfly fabric but the other fabrics to go with it are giving me concern. This is a big favour to ask but would you or a colleague be able to assist in this? I only want to know if you think the fabrics I have chosen would co-ordinate. I hope you don’t think this is too much to ask. If you say it is not possible then I’ll just have to guess, and that’s not really a problem. Please let me know,

    all best Janny

    • Hi Janny. Yes, thanks – the bridal shower was really enjoyable – Katy has some lovely, friendly friends. I have a better suggestion for the fabrics – if you tell me which ones you like I can send you samples so that you can see the true colours.

  4. Dear Rose – Glad you had a good time. I knew you would. You are one of those people who find enjoyment.

    Thanks for your very kind offer. Going off to choose now.

    all best Janny

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