Renaissance Diamond Quilt Pattern

Renaissance diamond quilt pattern

Renaissance diamond quilt pattern

The Renaissance diamond quilt pattern is a Fabric Freedom pattern designed to show off their Renaissance fabric range.  The design is theirs but I wrote the pattern for them.  They have now asked me to design their quilts as well, so I am looking forward to showing you my first design for them when the fabric reaches the shops.  This is the same fabric range that I used in the attic windows quilt.

I do not feel that this pattern is suitable for a beginner quilter, which is why I have not used it for my weekly emailed project.

The basis of the Renaissance diamond quilt is three different blocks, with two columns of each block.  The full quilt has six columns of eight blocks each, with a light 1″ sashing between the columns and around the outside of the quilt.

The quilt measures 43″ by 50″ and I have used 3/4 yard each of the two blender fabrics, 1/2 yard each of the two script fabrics, 3/8 yard of the large flower fabric and 1/4 yard each of the remaining four fabrics.

Cutting requirements for the Renaissance diamond quilt

I know that I normally list the square sizes at the beginning of the pattern, but in this case there are so many different square sizes that I will give them with each quilt block.

Renaissance diamond quilt block one

Renaissance diamond quilt block one

Quilt block one layout

Quilt block one layout

Making quilt block one

Cut eight 4.3/4″ squares in each of the rose on black and rose on white fabrics.  Cut thirty two 3.7/8″ squares in the red blender fabric.

Cut the blender squares in half along one diagonal.  Place one of these triangles on each edge of the floral squares.

Sew two triangles on and press

Sew two triangles on and press

Sew two of the triangles on opposite sides of the square and press.  Then sew the two remaining triangles to the other two sides of each square.  Trim the edges of the newly formed square where the triangle tips stick out.

Make eight blocks in black and eight in white.  Sew them together in two coloumns of eight blocks, beginning with a black square and then alternating with white all the way down the column.

Quilt block two

Quilt block two

Making quilt block two

Cut thirty two 2.5/8″ squares in the green leaf fabric and the pink/white floral fabric.  Cut sixteen 4.3/16″ squares in the red script and pink script fabrics.

Cut the script squares along both diagonals to make four triangles from each square.

Sew the 2.5/8″ squares together in pairs and then sew two pairs together to make four patch units.

Place triangles on the edges of the four patch unit

Place triangles on the edges of the four patch unit

Sew the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

Place a pink and a red triangle on each side of the four patch unit.  Sew the triangles together in pairs to make a larger triangle on each edge of the four patch units.  Check the placement of the colours:  the pink triangles are placed either side of the green squares and the red triangles are placed either side of the pink/green floral squares.

Sew the triangles to the four patch unit in the same way as above – sew two opposite edges first, press and then add the two remaining triangles.

Make sixteen of these blocks and sew them together in two columns of eight blocks each.

Completed quilt block three

Completed quilt block three

Making quilt block three

The third block is a little more complex than the other two, but it is assembled in the same way.  Cut sixteen 4.3/4″ squares in the large flower fabric.  Cut thirty two 2″ squares in both the pink script and the red script fabrics.  Cut sixty four 2.3/8″ squares in the dark blender fabric.

Quilt block three layout

Quilt block three layout

Once again the principle is to sew a triangle on each edge of a central square.  Cut the 2.3/8″ squares in half along one diagonal.

Place the large square in the middle.  On each edge place one red or pink script square with a triangle on either side of it.  Note that the red squares are diagonally opposite each other and so are the pink script squares.  Place the triangles so that they will form one large triangle when sewn to the squares.

Sew the triangles to the squares

Sew the triangles to the squares

Begin by sewing the triangles to the squares to form larger triangles.  Trim the edges of these larger triangles where the triangle tips stick out.

Sew two triangles to opposing sides of the large floral square,  press and then sew the remaining two triangles to the edges of the square.

Make sixteen of quilt block three and sew them together in two columns of eight blocks.

Sew sashing between the columns

Sew sashing between the columns

Assembling the renaissance diamond quilt

This is the easiest part of the quilt!

Sew together strips of 1.1/2″ wide light blender fabric to make seven strips 48.1/2″ long and two lengths 43.1/2″ long.

Sew the columns of quilt blocks together using the 48.1/2″ sashing strips.  Begin with one column of quilt block two, followed by a column of quilt block one and then two columns of quilt block three.  Then add the second column of quilt block one followed by the second column of quilt block two.  The sashing strips need to be at each side of the quilt as well as between each column.

Add sashing to the top and bottom of the quilt

Add sashing to the top and bottom of the quilt

Finally sew the 43.1/2″ sashing strips across the top and bottom of the quilt.

Back of the renaissance diamond quilt

Back of the renaissance diamond quilt

That completes the renaissance diamond quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Unusually for me, I have actually finished this quilt so I thought that you would like to see the back.

The quilt is too wide for just one piece of fabric for the backing, so I have sewn a 5″ width of pink fabric down the middle with a length of green on either side.

For the quilting of the renaissance diamond quilt I stitched in the ditch on each side of the sashing strips.  I then stitched around the central diamonds by sewing zigzags up and down each column.

Here’s the video:

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Comments

  1. Loved this Block forever, and now a new quilt to use it in, beautiful quilt today Rose, thank you very much!

  2. Congratulations on the appointment to quilt designer for Freedom Fabric Rose.

    Love this design and the colours are so ‘me’ – definitely one to do and straight to the top of ‘to do’ the list! 🙂

    • Thanks, Toni. This is one that they designed but I just wrote the instructions for them. The fabric range is gorgeous, so I’m thrilled to be associated with it.

  3. Elizabeth says:

    Hello Rose I was trying to email you but as I do not know that word press and do not have password to do it. I am writing to you this way, that quilt pattern you have just sent me, it really is an easy one , and I will try to attempt it slowly and see what i can do. thank you for such a lovely pattern. Best wishes to you love Elizabeth

    • Hi Elizabeth. Each step of this quilt is simple, but overall it appears quite overwhelming at first. As you say, taking it slowly is the answer. Glad you like it.

  4. Hi Rose,
    Really like both of these quilts but if I am honest I prefer the first one.Glad you are feeling better now.Trish

  5. Rose, You must spend your time thinking up patterns (lol)
    They are both beautiful.
    Congratulations on your appointment you deserve it as
    you really put a lot of work into your tutorials.
    Glad your energy levels are back to normal.
    How are you getting on with Minnie?

    • Thanks, Mary. Yes, I do seem to think about quilts a lot. My children would probably say that I’m obsessive. Didn’t have time to work with Minnie this week but I hope to finish a quilt with her help next week.

  6. This is a very nice design. Thank you Rose……it is going to have to go on the bucket list 🙂

  7. Marilyn Larkin says:

    Dear Rose,
    Congratulations on your appointment to Freedom Fabrics they could not have chosen a more erudite pattern writer. You are so succinct which makes your patterns so easy to follow. As for the fabric range in this quilt, so pretty, it is not a colour scheme I would usually select, but this pattern just sets it off perfectly. So pleased your energy levels are back, you can enjoy your quilt making again. Two quilts this week what a wonderful bonus. Thank-you. Enjoy your weekend.

    • Thanks for your kind comments, Marilyn. It’s certainly a gorgeous fabric range and I feel privileged to be working with Fabric Freedom.

  8. Pat Hurdle says:

    I really like this quilt! I think you need to have a lot more experience to get started and finish this one. I have a bad habit of too many UFO’S even tho they do eventually get finished.
    Pat H
    BC Canada

    • Hi Pat. It’s not as complicated as it looks to make, but I don’t feel that it qualifies as a beginner quilt. I have the same problem with UFO’s.

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