Christmas Table Centrepiece – Pinwheel

Christmas table centrepiece

Christmas table centrepiece

My Christmas table centrepiece doesn’t change every year, but every now and again it’s good to bring out something new.  This year I have tried out the Sew Simple fusible foam batting and I am thrilled with the way it works.  It’s not cheap, but I made my Christmas table centrepiece in a fraction of the time that I had expected – plus my project lies very flat, which isn’t always the case.

Cutting requirements for the Christmas table centrepiece

9″ squares:  four red, four green

Binding:  two 2″ strips of gold fabric cut across the width of fabric

Wadding:  one 16″ circle of fusible foam batting (it came in a pack of four, so I’ve got three more to play with.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the Christmas table centrepiece

I’ve made this project reversible, just to show you two options that you could use.  The fabric is a range called Joy at Christmas with a lovely paisley pattern.  I cut one 9″ strip across the width of red and of green.  You can cut four 9″ squares from each strip.

Make half square triangles with two red and two green squares.  Place a red and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangles from each pair of squares.

Sew the squares together in fours

Sew the squares together in fours

Sandwich the layers

Sandwich the layers

Sew the four half square triangles together to make a pinwheel for one side of the Christmas table centrepiece.  Sew the remaining four squares together to make a four patch unit for the second side.

Sandwich these two squares together with the 16″ circle of wadding.  Pass a pin through the middle of one side and make sure that it also passes through the middle of the other side.  If you’re using fusible sponge, as I did, you just need to iron now and the three layers will be stuck together beautifully.  If you’re using ordinary wadding, you’ll need to pin at this stage.

Quilt a spiral on the Christmas table centrepiece

Quilt a spiral on the Christmas table centrepiece

Add the binding

Add the binding

I quilted a spiral on my Christmas table centrepiece, starting in the middle and working out to the edge.  Because the pattern is different on the front and back, I couldn’t do any stitch in the ditch quilting, so a spiral seemed a good option.

Trim the excess fabric around the edge of the foam circle.  For the binding I chose to use 2″ strips of fabric, rather than my normal 2.1/2″.  This gives a smaller, neater finish.  I also used straight cut strips of fabric whereas I should have used strips cut on the bias because of the curves.  That was just because I was pushed for time, but it’s a small enough project that the binding looks fine to me.

Back of the Christmas table centrepiece

Back of the Christmas table centrepiece

I was really impressed with the fusible batting.  It saved time and made my Christmas table centrepiece very flat and easy to quilt.  The photo shows the second side which was made just using a four patch unit.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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Comments

  1. Noreen Roberts says:

    Rose, another wonderful Christmas project. Thank you. I just love it but can’t find the fusible foam wadding you are using. I’ve been to the Knitting and Stitching show today and no-ones heard of it. Can you help?

    • Hi Noreen. Do you know, I bought the foam wadding with the intention of selling it in the shop, but then I realised that it was too big to send at ‘large letter’ rate. If I have to allow for ‘small parcel’ postage rate it will become terribly expensive for what it is so I decided to keep it all for my own use. I bought it from a trade site, so I can’t tell you a supplier, I’m afraid.

      • Noreen Roberts says:

        Thanks for your reply. I guessed it was something like that as it doesn’t seem generally available. Maybe it will one day come into the shops.

        • Hi Noreen. I suppose I ought to try folding them – I assumed it would do them no good, but thinking about it they may well spring back into shape after being folded. I’ll let you know how I get on.

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