Cross Hatch Quilting


 

Cross hatch quilting

Cross hatch quilting

Cross hatch quilting is my next choice for the machine quilting sampler.  This is a simple but very effective filler quilting design and is still a straight line quilting pattern.  You can see my previous post on straight line quilting here.

Mark the lines first

Mark the lines first

Mark the lines for cross hatch quilting

As I did for the first block of straight line quilting, I began by stitching around the block to stabilise the area.  For cross hatch quilting it usually helps to mark the lines first although you may feel confident enough to use the width of your sewing foot as a guide for sewing the lines.

I marked the line across the diagonal first and then marked all the lines 1/2″ away working on one side of the diagonal.  Then I moved the ruler and filled in the cross hatch quilting lines on the other side of the diagonal.

When you have finished the lines in one direction, draw a line along the other diagonal and repeat the process.

How to do basic cross hatch quilting

The cross hatch quilting lines are stitched in a similar way – sew all the lines in one direction first and then sew them all in the other direction.  That way you will have less chance of missing a line or of ending up needing to sew lines a distance from each other.  I began in the top right corner and sewed that first small line then stitched along the block outline to get to the next line.  By being methodical you also end up sewing each line in the opposite direction to the one before.  This helps to keep the block overall straight.  When you have finished quilting in one direction, then you can sew all the lines in the opposite direction.

How to do raised square cross hatch quilting

Basic cross hatch quilting

Basic cross hatch quilting

Raised square cross hatch quilting

Raised square cross hatch quilting

On the left you can see a completed section of basic cross hatch quilting.  On the right the top half of the block seems to have every other square raised.  This is an illusion.  What I have actually done is flattened alternate squares using very dense quilting (technical term microstippling!).  This makes the unquilted squares appear to be raised up by comparison.

It obviously takes a lot longer to add in this microstippling, but it really does look lovely if you want a particular section of quilting to really stand out.  If I had used a thicker wadding, then the effect would have been even more pronounced.

Here’s the video:

 

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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