Broken Plate Quilt


 

Greek cross quilt

Greek cross quilt

The broken plate quilt block goes by many, many names so I have plumped for just one of them to name this quilt pattern.  I have made it using two variations of the block and two colour variations of one of those.  That may sound complicated, but trust me – it isn’t!  Each block is very easy to make – so simple that I didn’t even feel it was necessary to make a video.

The quilt is 45″ square and I have used 1/2 yard of white fabric, 1 yard of cream and 1.1/4 yards of red.

Cutting requirements for the broken plate quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  fifty red, eighteen cream, thirty two white

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty five cream, forty eight red

3.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles:  fifty two red, fifty two cream

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making half square triangles

All three versions of the block use half square triangles, so I’ll begin with that.  Place two 3.7/8″ squares with right sides together – these will be either red and white or red and cream.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowance towards the red and trim the corners of the square.

Broken plates quilt block

Broken plates quilt block

Making the broken plates quilt block

For this version of the block you will need two 3.7/8″ squares in both red and cream, one 3.1/2″ cream square and four 3.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles in both red and cream.  There are nine blocks required.

Broken plates quilt block layout

Broken plates quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Sew all the pairs of rectangles together to make them into 3.1/2″ squares.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the broken plates quilt block.

 

Indian hammer quilt block

Indian hammer quilt block

Indian hammer quilt block layout

Indian hammer quilt block layout

Indian Hammer Quilt Block

For the second version of this block I am choosing indian hammer for the name, but it is just a different colour version of the same block.  You will need four of this version of the block.  All that I have changed is the corner triangles – these are now white rather than cream.

The idea was that I wanted the white triangles to form those vaguely circular designs that you can see in the quilt.

For each of the indian hammer quilt blocks you will need two 3.7/8″ squares in both red and white, one 3.1/2″ cream square and four 3.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles in both red and cream.

Lay the squares out in three rows of three, just as above but with white rather than cream triangles in the corners.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the indian hammer quilt block.

Greek cross quilt block

Greek cross quilt block

Greek cross quilt block layout

Greek cross quilt block layout

Making the Greek Cross quilt block

This version of the block uses squares instead of the pairs of rectangles used above.  You will need twelve of these.

For each block you will need four red 3.1/2″ squares, one cream 3.1/2″ square and two 3.7/8″ squares in both red and white.

Lay the squares out in three rows of three, sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the Greek cross quilt block.  (Actually the true Greek cross is slightly different, but I just needed a different name from the two above!)

Assembling the broken plate quilt

The quilt blocks are sewn together in five rows of five.  It is a very simple layout so I will just list the blocks for the rows.

Rows one, three and five are all the same as each other:  a broken plates quilt block at each end and in the middle, with a Greek cross  quilt block between them in the second and fourth spaces.

Rows two and four are also the same as each other:  a Greek cross quilt block at each end and in the middle, with an Indian hammer quilt block betwen them in the second and fourth spaces.

This is a very simple quilt pattern and I hope that I have just provided a bit more for the eye to look at by using several variations of the block.  You may have noticed that there’s something different about the photo at the top.  That’s because I used EQ7.  I made all the quilt blocks and then used photos of the blocks to try out different layout options for the quilt.  I am quite excited at the possibilities now that I am beginning to feel a bit more comfortable using the software – I’m also hoping that some of my photos may be a bit better!

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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