Faberge Egg Style Quilt


 

Faberge egg style quilt

Faberge egg style quilt

For this quilt pattern I began with the steeple and weathervane quilt block:  this is a nine patch block attributed to Nancy Cabot and quite simple but effective.  I used purple and gold for part of the block because steeples are usually set on churches, but then the colours reminded me of Cadburys Cream Eggs so I revised the layout to give more of an egg shape.  The rich colouring then brought to mind Faberge eggs.  I’d like to pretend that I’m terribly organised and plan my quilts in advance, but as you can tell from that my patterns tend to make themselves up as I go along!

The finished quilt measures 52″ by 40″ and I have used 1.1/4 yards each of purple and lilac with 3/4 yard of gold – it’s actually a metallic yellow fabric.

Cutting requirements

3.1/2″ squares: eight lilac

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  eight lilac, four gold

3.7/8″ squares:  sixty each in purple and lilac, twenty each in purple and gold

For the border:  five 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the steeple and weathervane quilt block

Make half square triangles with the 3.7/8″ squares in purple/lilac and in purple/gold.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowance towards the purple fabric and trim the corners to reduce bulk in the seams.

Steeple and weathervane quilt block layout

Steeple and weathervane quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  The first two rows represent the weathervane and are made entirely from purple/lilac half square triangles.  The next four rows represent the steeple.  Row three is made with two lilac rectangles with two half square triangles in the middle.

Row four has a lilac square at each end, two purple/gold half square triangles in the middle and a purple/lilac half square triangle either side of the centre.  Row five is made using two purple/lilac and four purple/gold half square triangles.  Row six has the gold rectangle in the middle with two purple/gold half square triangles on either side.  In each corner the four half square triangles are placed so that they form a shape like an arrow head – I always find that these sort of shapes help me to place the squares correctly.

Back view of the steeple and weathervane quilt block

Back view of the steeple and weathervane quilt block

 

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  You will need to make four of the steeple and weathervane quilt blocks.

There are a lot of half square triangles in this block which can make the seams quite bulky.  In order to help a little with this, I have pressed some of the seams open – that’s why I’ve shown you the back view of the block here.

It’s okay to have a combination of seams that are pressed to one side with seams that have been pressed open.

 

Sew the blocks in pairs

Sew the blocks in pairs

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Assembling the Faberge egg style quilt

Sew the quilt blocks together in pairs with the yellow squares at the bottom of the blocks.

Flip one pair of blocks so that the yellow edge is at the top and sew the pairs of blocks to each other.  At this stage you have the two Faberge eggs in the middle with weathervanes along the top and bottom but nothing down the sides.

Make four more weathervanes

Make four more weathervanes

Sew weathervanes to each side of the quilt

Sew weathervanes to each side of the quilt

Make four more weathervanes.  That’s the first two rows of the original steeple and weathervane quilt block.  Each one is made using twelve purple/lilac half square triangles.  Sew these together in pairs.  This will give you two strips 6.1/2″ wide by 36.1/2″ long.

Sew one strip to either side of the quilt so that the eggs in the middle of the quilt now have weathervanes all round them.

Quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the long edges and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the remaining two edges.

That completes the Faberge egg style quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.

Here’s the video:

Fabric giveaway

Fabric giveaway

Guess the name competition

Thank you once again for your participation in the naming the quilt competition – both with providing a huge number of imaginative names and with voting for them afterwards.  I counted up the votes last night:  there were votes across all the groups, but the group with the most votes was group 3.  That was Birds in flight/Lost winds/Blowing in the wind/Catch the wind.  All beautiful names.

Which brings us of course to the fabric giveaway.  For this I used the names of everyone who had submitted a name suggestion and drew one of the names out of a bowl.  The winner is:  Patricia Eason.  Well done, Patricia.  I have emailed you to ask for your postal address.  I’ve given you my personal email address as I have had trouble in the past with emails not getting through to the webmail address.

Thanks once again to everyone who participated.

 

Craftsy

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Comments

  1. Debbie Walker says:

    I love the faberge egg quilt.
    The colours are beautifully matched .
    The instructions are clear and precise , well done Rose for another beautiful quilt.

    Hugz Debz x

  2. Debra Friendly (Canada) says:

    Rose – What a wonderful pattern and I really like the name (Faberge, not Cadbury)! This one looks like it would be nice in red/black/white or red/black/charcoal gray. I think I’ll be bookmarking this one.

    Take care.

  3. Hi Rose,
    Love the Faberge egg quilt, very striking indeed. Have you decided to rename the mosaic quilt? I would suggest blowing in the wind brings back memories of being young and fancy free. Well done to Patricia. Enjoy the weekend and do tell us all about it next week.

    • Thanks, Trish. I think that was the attraction of that name – so many people were probably remembering the song and the feelings of youth. Yes, it would certainly be a lovely name for the quilt. I’ll try and write a blog post about the workshop on Sunday.

  4. Margaret W Fairgrieve says:

    Thanks again for yet an other wonderful quilt
    You have a wonderful talent thanks for sharing .
    Margaret W Fairgrieve

  5. Thank you Rose for another great Block,you come up with some orignal names and ideas.Cheers Arlene,Have a wonderful weekend.

  6. Carole Yoxall says:

    Hi Rose,
    I love this Faberge quilt ,what a fantastic name.It really fits on all counts.
    Have a great weekend in Wales Carole x

  7. Rose,
    Beautiful block! It looks so difficult until you showed
    the cut squares. Love the colours you used.
    Thank you.

  8. Ange Owen says:

    Hello Rose, once again a lovely pattern, thank you. Shall run this off and perhaps make it up one day, size sounds great for a double bed just across. I live about three miles from the Woolen Museum and was going to pop across to have a look at the quilts, unfortunately my husband has been really poorly today so probably won’t be able to make it. Would have been lovely to meet you. Have a lovely day and a safe journey home, Ange

    • Hi Ange. Oh what a pity. I hope your husband feels better soon. I think that DeAnne’s quilts are going to be on show till the end of April, so you’ve plenty of time yet. It’s about three hours from here so I’ll have a very early start tomorrow.

  9. Cecilia Alcantar says:

    Dear Rose, I am delighted with your Easter Faberge Egg quilt pattern.
    Only you are gifted with so many ideas of quilting patterns like this.
    I gladly work on one quilt and admire your thirst to make one weekly.
    That’s a good thing, and I continue learning and growing with your tutorials.
    Thanks again, and also thanks for the recent competition naming the mosiac quilt!! I like the final choice made, So you have a great upcoming trip! Cecilia

    • Thanks for your kind comments, Cecilia. I’m sure the difference is that you finish your quilts, whereas I never seem to get time to finish mine!

  10. Caroline says:

    Rose…I really look forward to Fridays to see what wonderful quilt you have designed and made up . I think it’s amazing how you come up with so many ideas.
    I like this quilt and would like to know what type of quilting you would do on it. I often wonder this most weeks. Can you give us some ideas please?
    How lovely to do the workshop, it’s always so nice to be with like minded people.

    • Thanks, Caroline. You are very kind. I’m very conscious of the fact that ideas on the quilting would be helpful, but I rarely seem to get the time to finish my quilts. I have a hectic month coming up but once things have calmed down a little I’ll try and show how I finished quilts more quickly than I do now.

  11. Hi Rose, I love the Faberge Egg Quilt and the colours you used.
    Have a great time at the National Wool Museum. You will love it there
    and there will be so much to see. Have a nice weekend, Jean

  12. Gladys Hontz says:

    Rose, I love the Friday emails from you and look forward to them so much. Your Faberge Egg Quilt is just beautiful!!! Will you show us a picture when you have it quilted? Have a great trip to Wales, and please show us a sample of what you learned. Thank you so much, you inspire to keep plugging away at my quilt projects.

    • Thanks for your comments, Gladys. Yes, I’ll certainly try and get the quilting done soon. The exhibition and workshop were both amazing – I’ll try and write about them later today.

  13. Sandra Barnett says:

    Rose.
    You’ve done it again. Love the Faberge Egg Pattern. and love your choice of colors. Very elegant. I do look forward to Fridays just to see what you have dreamed up.
    Hope you have a fun weekend at the Woolen Museum Workshop.
    Sandra

  14. Love this quilt.

    As to the renaming of the competition quilt, it seems the answer is blowing in the wind.

  15. Thank you Rose for another beautiful quilt colours are lovely

  16. Definitely a classy pattern – what a bold move using metallic fabric too – did you have to stabilize it before stitching? I am tempted to think that lace with a visible backing fabric would look nice in a quilt or border, but as a ‘newby’ I need a more experienced quilter to advise on this please?

    • Hi Val. Oh no the metallic fabric didn’t need any special treatment – it just has a metallic thread running through it that gives the fabric a sort of sheen. It’s treated just like a cotton fabric. I have never used lace on a fabric background in a quilt myself, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t look lovely. I think that washing might worry me, but then there is often lace on little girls’ dresses and that must wash well. I did have a look at the site that you suggested, but they said that any block patterns downloaded would be subject to copyright so I couldn’t use them.

  17. Bonnie Jenkins says:

    Hi Rose,
    Another beautiful quilt design. I don’t know how you do it. I have to say I especially love your videos. I am the type of quilter who needs to see how things are done. I find it hard to follow instructions in a book. My husband (bless him) tells everyone it is because I was Junior Primary teacher, and like the little ones I need step by step instructions .LOL.
    Thanks again. Kind regards Bonnie

    • Thanks, Bonnie. I think everyone has different ways of learning – and I think small steps are always more easy to understand than several steps combined. I’m glad you find the videos helpful, anyway.

  18. Love the colours & much prefer Faberge to Cadbury! Much better for the hips! Look forward to hearing about the flannel experience & how to get on & actually finish projects. Enjoy your trip. X

  19. Oh, Rose, wow, absolutely gorgeous!! I myself prefer the Cadbury eggs. Ya gotta treat yourself sometimes. Cadbury eggs and peeps. Your website is a true inspiritation. Your instructions are so easy to understand, even a veteran over 10 yrs. quilting , I still have some difficulty understanding some of the pattern instructions. You have a true gift and please keep on sharing your fascinating and amazing patterns with us, Sincerely, Linda
    from U.S,A.

    • Thank you so much for your kind comments, Linda. I’m really pleased to feel that my quilt patterns help others – I feel privileged to be able to share them with so many people.

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