Christmas Bunting Templates


How to make Christmas bunting flags

How to make Christmas bunting flags

As Christmas approaches I thought that it would be a good idea to share my thoughts on how to make Christmas bunting flags:  my method is very simple and there’s a link to the bunting templates below.  I have made six bunting flags here but of course you could make as many as you needed depending on the length that you need and either repeat the designs or make up some of your own.

Cutting requirements

Light background fabric:  9″ strips cut across the width of fabric

Scraps of both Christmas fabric and interfacing

Length of ribbon or cord to hang the bunting

Click for Christmas bunting templates

Making the Christmas bunting flags

Mark 60 degree lines

Mark 60 degree lines

Mark and cut the bunting flags

Mark and cut the bunting flags

Cut a 9″ strip of fabric across the width of fabric.  Place your ruler so that the 60 degree line runs across the bottom edge of the fabric and mark a line on the fabric.  Turn the ruler to use the other 60 degree line to mark the lines in the other direction.  Cut along the lines to create the triangles which will form the bunting flags.

 

 

 

Two methods to stop fraying

Two methods to stop fraying

Turn under a 1/2" seam on the top

Turn under a 1/2″ seam on the top

In order to prevent fraying I tried two different methods.  On the left hand triangle I turned under a small hem and sewed it down with straight stitch.  On the right hand one I just zig zagged all the way around.  On balance I think I prefer the left hand option with a hemmed edge, but the other one does give a slightly wavy edge which you may prefer.

Along the top edge, turn under a 1/2″ seam.  Sew this as close to the bottom of the seam as possible to create a tube.  You will need this to thread the ribbon for handing the Christmas bunting flags.

Cut the bunting templates

Cut the bunting templates

Place the shapes on the bunting flags

Place the shapes on the bunting flags

Cut the bunting templates out in paper.  Make up a series of scraps of Christmas fabric with interfacing – I was able to use scraps of interfacing here.  Cut the template shapes in fabric and place one on each bunting triangle.

 

 

 

 

 

Zigzag round each shape

Zigzag round each shape

Sew around the edge of each bunting template shape using a zigzag stitch.  I set my sewing machine to stitch width 3 and stitch length 1.  In the example shown, when you reach the tip of a star, finish with your needle down on the right hand side before you swivel the fabric.  When you reach the base of each spike of the star, finish with your needle down on the left hand side before you swivel the fabric.  This should give you a neat corner in each case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thread the ribbon on a safety pin

Thread the ribbon on a safety pin

Push the safety pin through the bunting flag

Push the safety pin through the bunting flag

When you have completed the Christmas bunting flags, it just remains to string them up.  Thread the end of the ribbon on to a safety pin.  This will give you a solid end to push through the tube at the top of each flag.  Keep going until you have all the flags threaded, hang up and enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. How interesting Rose. Being from the States I have never heard of the bunting flags. Is this a tradition in the UK? Where did it get the name bunting flags? Thanks for a new idea. Bea

    • Hi Bea. I had to look up the derivation of ‘bunting’. It was originally a type of wool fabric that was used for making flags. Now it is the name given to strings of triangular flags. I’m amazed – I just assumed that all the world used bunting. We use it for anything we want to celebrate – like at Christmas it could hang from the mantelpiece or along the wall. The streets are always strung with red, white and blue bunting for things like royal weddings or other special occasions.

      • Thank you for that information. If they are used in the US it is not here in Washington that I know of. Maybe we call them something else because we do have flags, but they don’t have designs on them like Christmas. I’m going to pay more attention. Nice talking with you. Bea

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