GRANNY’S FAVOURITE QUILT BLOCK


Grannys favourite quilt block

Grannys favourite quilt block

It’s surprising how many quilt blocks have either Granny or Grandma in their name.  I think that this is a lovely example of the way quilt block patterns were originally shared by word of mouth.  You can just imagine someone passing on a pattern that their grandmother had shown to them.  This one should be a simple, traditional quilt block, but somehow I managed to sew the rows together in the wrong order.  Oh dear!  The instructions following are for the correct version of Granny’s Favourite quilt block!  I have made it as a 20″ square using two colours plus white.

 

Cutting requirements

2.1/2″ squares:  twenty four red, thirty two white, twenty eight pink

2.7/8″ squares:  eight each in red and white

 

Making the Granny”s Favourite quilt block

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a red and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are 2.1/2″ squares.

 

 

 

 

 

Layout for top half of granny's favourite quilt block

Layout for top half of granny’s favourite quilt block

Lay the patchwork squares out:  there are ten rows of ten squares, but as the granny’s favourite quilt block is symmetrical you are basically making rows one to five twice.  Row one is the same as row eight, row two the same as row seven and so on.

The pink and red 2.1/2″ squares make nine patch units with the red squares forming an inner circle within the block.  There is a 2.1/2″ red square in each corner and the red squares and half square triangles are placed to form a larger red triangle in the middle of each edge of the block.

 

 

 

Sew the rows together

Sew the rows together

Sew the squares together across each row and the sew the rows together to complete the granny’s favourite quilt block.  In the photo you can see the first five rows already sewn together with the remaining rows underneath ready to be sewn to the top half of the block.

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