Pinwheel Star Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt

For the pinwheel star quilt pattern I have used three different quilt blocks – all very simple ones.  The quilt is a good lap quilt size (41″ square) and comes together really quickly.  There aren’t even too many half square triangles!  I’ve used 3/4 yard each of red, blue and cream fabrics to make nine quilt blocks which are all 9″ finished size, together with three borders in the same colours.  Together they come together to make a pretty star with pinwheels in the quilt corners.

You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the pinwheel star quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

4.3/8″ squares:  eight blue, eight cream

3.7/8″ squares:  six blue, six cream

3.1/2″ squares:  one blue

1.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  ten red

1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  ten red

2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips:  two cream

2.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  two cream

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  four blue, four cream

For the borders you will need to cut four 3.1/2″ cream strips across the width of fabric, four 1.1/2″ blue strips and four 3.1/2″ red strips

Central quilt block layout

Central quilt block layout

Making the central quilt block

Begin with a 3.1/2″ blue square in the middle.  Sew a 3.1/2″ cream strip to top and bottom and a 7.1/2″ cream strip to each side.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom and finally sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You only need to make one of this block.

Making the pinwheel quilt block

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles using the 4.3/8″ squares.  Place a blue and a cream square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4″ squares.

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Use four half square triangles for each pinwheel.  Place them in two pairs as shown.  Sew the pairs together and then sew the pairs to each other to make a four patch unit.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom of the block and then sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You need to make four of these blocks.

Making the stripey quilt block

Stripey quilt block layout

Stripey quilt block layout

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place three of these side by side with the blue triangles in the top left.

The rest of the block is made using a blue 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strip at the top, then a cream strip and finally the half square triangles.

Sew the half square triangles together first and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make four of this block.

Assembling the pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  The first row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed with the triangles on the bottom.

The second row is made with the central block in the middle and a stripey block on either side.  These are placed so that the triangles run along the edges of the central block.

The third row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed so that the triangles are at the top of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First quilt border

First quilt border

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of cream fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 27.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made using 1.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the sides.

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Finally for the third border I have enclosed the quilt with 3.1/2″ strips of red – two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 41.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pinwheel star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Facing Africa - NOMA

Facing Africa – NOMA

Recently I have become aware of a small charity that gives extraordinary help to individual people with a dreadful disease called NOMA.  I am so impressed with what they do that I feel I want to help them as much as I can.  I have set up a Just Giving page for donations and I am going to donate all the proceeds of my quilt sales to them.  You can find out more about them either by clicking on the photo or by clicking on Facing Africa – NOMA.

 

Facing Africa – NOMA

Facing Africa - NOMA

Facing Africa – NOMA

Facing Africa – NOMA is a small charity that makes extraordinary differences to individual people suffering from NOMA.  I have only recently become aware of it and I am in awe of what the charity achieves.

In case you are wondering, the photo shows a quilt that I made using the Facing Africa – NOMA logo placed on the background of an Ethiopian flag.  Their work takes place in Ethiopia.

What is NOMA?

Noma is a devastating disease that is caused by poverty and malnutrition.  The shocking thing is that it is totally preventable.  I cannot describe it better than the Facing Africa website does:

Noma (cancrum oris) is an acute and ravaging gangrenous infection affecting the face. The victims of Noma are mainly children under the age of 6, caught in a vicious circle of extreme poverty and chronic malnutrition who suffer unimaginable pain, discomfort and social exclusion from their communities.

I should warn you that I found the photos on their website distressing.  This is not a charity with widespread appeal because it has cute images of dogs or cats.  But it is one that really needs support to enable it to continue to help these people.

How does Facing Africa – NOMA help?

Twice a year the charity funds a team of highly specialised volunteer medical personnel to spend two weeks in Addis Ababa (the capital city of Ethiopia).  They operate on NOMA sufferers and also share their expertise with local doctors and medical specialists.  The administration and organisation of these trips must be mind bogglingly complex, but less than 6% of the charity’s budget is spent on administration.

They also work with the patients while they are recovering from treatment.  Amongst other things they teach them sewing.  Obviously I sat up when I read that – I need to find out if they could use any help there.

How can we help?

Please donate

Please donate

I know that like me you must receive many, many requests for help from charities.  Every now and then there will be one that really tugs at your heartstrings – and that’s what has happened to me with Facing Africa.  I have set up a Just Giving donation page where if you feel that you would like to donate you can safely donate to the charity.  No donation is too small – any amount will be hugely appreciated.  The money does not come anywhere near me:  it is paid straight to Facing Africa by Just Giving.  Click on the photo to be taken to the donation page or click here.

In addition, I have decided to donate all the proceeds of my quilt sales to the charity.  I’m not bright enough to work out how to pay the money direct to them, but you have my assurance that I will transfer the full amount recived for any quilt sales straight to Facing Africa. I know that you make your own quilts, but if you know anyone who is looking for a quilt, do suggest that they take a look at my quilt sales page.

As all my quilt patterns are supplied to you free, I have often been asked if I would like to accept a charitable donation.  The answer is a resounding YES PLEASE.

 

July 4th Quilt Block

July 4th quilt block

The July 4th quilt block seems rather appropriate at this time of the year.  It's a four patch block made obviously in red, white and blue.  I've made it here as a 12" square. Cutting requirements for the July 4th quilt block 3.1/2" squares:  four … [Continue reading]

Bouncing Betty Quilt

Bouncing Betty quilt

I'm thrilled with the Bouncing Betty quilt.  The quilt block itself is incredibly simple, but when I sewed them together and rotated a few of them, magical things happened.  It became a completely different looking quilt from what I had expected with … [Continue reading]

Some Finished Quilts

Feathers in the corners

I've often been asked to share some of my finished quilts - I just wish that I had the time to finish more of them!  This week I've managed to quilt several quilts so now I just need to bind them. Finished quilts - the Soar quilt For this … [Continue reading]

Martha Washington Star Quilt Block

Martha Washington Star quilt block

The Martha Washington Star quilt block is a four patch block also known by the rather lovely names of Queen Victoria, Dewey's Victory, Annie's Choice and Octagonal Star.  I've made it here as a 16" square. Cutting requirements for the Martha … [Continue reading]

Soar Quilt Pattern

Soar quilt

The soar quilt is made using a Kona Bay fabric range called Soar which I think is quite beautiful.  I've begun with a rectangle that I have cut to the proportions of the golden rectangle, considered to be the most pleasing to the eye.  You can read … [Continue reading]

Golden Rectangle Quilts

Golden rectangle quilt panel

The golden rectangle is an interesting idea for quilters because it may make us think about the size of the quilts that we make.  The basic idea of the golden rectangle is that it is made of a square and a rectangle.  The smaller rectangle is of the … [Continue reading]

Cornerstone Quilt Block

Cornerstone quilt block

The cornerstone quilt block is a really pretty block, although I've made it too large (18" square) for it to be used as a cornerstone. Cutting requirements for the cornerstone quilt block 3.1/2" squares:  twelve light blue, four dark blue, four … [Continue reading]

Diamond Star Quilt Pattern

Diamond star quilt

The diamond star quilt is made using two different quilt blocks - I found that when I used the one block only, the block design rather disappeared in the quilt.  I have made nine blocks which are 18" square finished size, using 1.1/4 yards of dark … [Continue reading]

%d bloggers like this: