Double Windmill Quilt Block

 

Double windmill quilt block

Double windmill quilt block

The double windmill quilt block is a four patch block which is attributed to Nancy Cabot.  It’s a lovely simple block and would look great in a quilt as I assume it will create a grid across the quilt.

Cutting requirements for the double windmill quilt block

6.1/2″ square:  one light blue

3.7/8″ squares:  two each in dark blue and light blue, two each in light blue and white, two each in dark blue and white

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the double windmill quilt block

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark fabric and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Double windmill quilt block layout

Double windmill quilt block layout

Lay the patchwork out in what would be four rows of four if you count the central square as four squares.  The 6.1/2″ square obviously goes in the middle.  In each corner there is a dark blue/light blue half square triangle.  Between each corner there are a light blue/white and a dark blue/white half square triangle.  These are placed so that the light blue triangles always combine to form a larger triangle, while the dark blue and the white triangles always combine to form a stripe.

Make three columns

Make three columns

Sew the two squares above and below the central square to each other and then sew them to the large square to create one column

Sew the four squares down each side to form two columns.  Sew the columns to each other to complete the double windmill quilt block.

Double windmill quilt image

Double windmill quilt image

Here’s a digital image of a quilt using just the double windmill quilt block.  As I had hoped, it forms a lovely grid across the quilt – but also some other lovely secondary designs.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

King Richard Quilt Pattern

 

King Richard quilt

King Richard quilt

The King Richard Quilt is named for King Richard III who has been in the news a lot this week.  For those of you who live outside the UK, he was King of England in the 15th Century and died in battle in 1485.  He was buried in an umnarked grave at the scene of the battle and his remains were found and identified under a car park in Leicester a few years ago.  Yesterday his remains were laid to rest in Leicester Cathedral with great pomp and ceremony.

So the quilt this week is dedicated to him and I have used the Kings Crown quilt block with the purple and gold that I tend to think of as regal colours.  The quilt measures 62″ square and I have used 1 yard each of gold, purple and green with 1.1/4 yards of white.  As usual, you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount on this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the King Richard quilt

9.7/8″ squares:  eight gold, eight green

6.7/8″ squares:  ten purple, ten green

3.7/8″ squares:  forty white, forty gold

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty white

For the sashing you will need twelve 2.1/2″ by 18.1/2″ rectangles with four 2.1/2″ purple squares for the cornerstones

For the border you will need 2.1/2″ strips of purple – two at 58.1/2″ long for the top and bottom of the quilt and two 62.1/2″ long for the sides.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Making the pinwheel quilt block

Make half square triangles with the 9.7/8″ squares.  Place a green and a gold square with right squares together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units and you need four of them for each pinwheel block.  Sew the squares together in pairs, taking care with the placements so that they form that pinwheel shape.  Sew the pairs to each other to complete the pinwheel quilt block.  You will need to make four of these.

Kings crown quilt block layout

Kings crown quilt block layout

Making the Kings Crown quilt block

Make more (lots more!) half square triangles with the 6.7/8″ in purple and green and the 3.7/8″ squares in gold and white.

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  The large half square triangles are all placed in the middle with the purple forming a diamond in the centre of the block.  There’s a white square in each corner and the small half square triangles are placed along each edge of the block.  Along each edge there are two gold triangles facing one way and two facing the other way, so that in the middle of the edge you get that larger white triangle pointing in towards the middle of the block.

Begin sewing the squares together in pairs

Begin sewing the squares together in pairs

Sew the squares together across the top and bottom rows.  For the middle of the block you will have to sew two small triangles together vertically first, to make them the same size as the large half square triangles.  Then you’ll be able to sew them together across the rows.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the kings crown quilt block.  You will need to make five of these for the King Richard quilt.

Sew sashing strips between the blocks

Sew sashing strips between the blocks

Assembling the King Richard quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows 1 and 3 are the same as each other – one kings crown block at each end with a pinwheel block in the middle.  Sew a sashing strip between each pair of blocks, so you will need two sashing strips for each row of three blocks.

Row 2 is the reverse, with a pinwheel block at each end and a kings crown block in the middle (and two sashing strips).  Sew the blocks together across each row.

Use purple squares as cornerstones

Use purple squares as cornerstones

In order to join the rows to each other, make up two sashing strips using three of the 18.1/2″ sashing strips with a 2.1/2″ purple square between them – so that’s two purple squares for each three sashing strips.  Sew one of these long sashing strips between rows 1 and 2, and another between rows 2 and 3.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of purple fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 62.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the King Richard quilt top.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I have a busy weekend ahead decorating the kitchen.  We have accepted an offer on my father’s house and so now I am getting my own house ready to put on the market.  I want to have the painting finished and out of the way before my daughter comes home for Easter.

Craftsy

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