Making Flange Quilt Binding

 

Making flange quilt binding

Making flange quilt binding

Making flange quilt binding is a great way of giving a delicate look to your border – it looks as though you have done something clever with your border, but in fact you just use two different fabrics in the binding.  I have written before about making flange quilt binding, but I’ve been asked to give a more detailed explanation of how to make it.

I’ve used the bullseye quilt block and you can find instructions for it here.

Sew the blue and white strips together

Sew the blue and white strips together

Making flange quilt binding

I am using my normal double fold quilt binding, but just with a few adjustments.  When making  flange quilt binding you need to have different widths of two fabrics so that both the dark and light fabrics will show up.  I have used 1.1/4″ strips of the dark fabric (blue) and 1.3/4″ strips of the light fabric (white).  Sew these together along the length using a 1/4″ seam.

Fold the strip in half and press

Fold the strip in half and press

Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and then fold the strip in half along the length and press.  One side of the binding will be all white and the other side will be both blue and white.

Joining flange quilt binding strips

Joining flange quilt binding strips

Joining strips of flange quilt binding

The strips of binding are joined together in the same way as for normal binding.  Place two strips with right sides together and at right angles to each other.

Sew across the diagonal of the square formed where the two strips cross each other.  Cut the excess triangle of fabric off about 1/4″ from the seam.

Sewing the binding to the quilt

Sewing the binding to the quilt

Sewing the quilt flange binding to the quilt

Place the binding on the back of the quilt with the white side showing and the blue/white side facing the quilt backing.  Begin about half way down one side of the quilt and leave a trailing edge of about 6″ before you start sewing.

Form a mitred corner

Form a mitred corner

When you reach the corner of the quilt, form a mitred corner in the same way as you would for normal binding.

Continue sewing the binding to all edges of the quilt.

When you get back to the first edge of the quilt, you can join the two ends of binding by turning under a small hem on one side and tucking the other end of the binding inside it, but the binding is slightly more bulky than usual so you may wish to try this method which gives a diagonal join to the flange quilt binding ends.

Turn the corner down on the right hand end

Turn the corner down on the right hand end

Turn the corner up on the left end

Turn the corner up on the left hand end

The final join in the flange quilt binding

Stop sewing the binding to the quilt when you have a good 10″ or so gap between this final strip of binding and the beginning of the binding.

Open out the binding strips so that they are flat.  On the right hand end, turn the corner down towards the quilt, finger press the fold.  At this stage I usually mark a line along the fold line using fabric marker.  Pass the left hand end of the binding over the right hand end and mark the point where they overlap.  Turn up the corner of the left hand end of the binding up (away from the quilt) so that the fold line will follow the line of the fold in the other end of the binding.  Finger press and then mark this line.

The two binding strips are at right angles to each other

The two binding strips are at right angles to each other

Bring the two marked lines together.  This will mean that the two strips of binding will be at right hand angles to each other, just as they are when you join binding strips together.  Make sure that the two marked lines are in line with each other and sew along the line.  Trim the excess binding and finger press the seam open.

Now you can lay this section of binding back on the quilt and sew across the gap so that the flange quilt binding is now completely attached to the quilt.  I’m sorry if this doesn’t seem very clear, but it’s incredibly difficult to describe with words – you may find the video will make it more clear.

Sew the binding to the front of the quilt

Sew the binding to the front of the quilt

Finishing the flange quilt binding

You can now flip the binding to the front of the quilt and hand sew it in place.  You should have about 1/4″ of both white and blue showing on the front of the quilt, giving that delicate looking frame that only making flange quilt binding can give.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Ozark Trail Quilt Block Pattern

Ozark trail quilt block

Ozark trail quilt block

The Ozark Trail quilt block is named for the Ozark mountains in Missouri, America.  The trail itself is a hiking trail which will eventually stretch over 500 miles.

Cutting requirements for the ozark trail quilt block

2.1/2″ squares:  twenty six each in brown and white (but don’t cut these as they can be speed pieced)

4.7/8″ squares:  six each in brown and white

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the ozark trail quilt block

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a brown and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowance towards the brown fabric and trim the corners of the square.

Sew strips of brown and white together

Sew strips of brown and white together

Sew them in pairs

Sew them in pairs

The 2.1/2″ squares are all made into four patch units and the quickest way of doing this is to cut 2.1/2″ strips of brown and white across the width of fabric.  Sew one brown and one white strip together along the length and cut the resulting panel at 2.1/2″ intervals.   This will give you rectangles of fabric 2.1/2″ wide and 4.1/2″ long which can be used in pairs to make four patch units.  Sew the strips together in pairs, rotating one of them so that the brown squares are diagonally opposite each other.

Ozark trail quilt block layout

Ozark trail quilt block layout

Lay the patchwork squares out in five rows of five.  The actual layout is simple enough – alternate the four patch units and half square triangles across each row and down each column, but of course it’s the rotation of the squares that make the design work.

The four patch units are placed so that the brown squares broadly form the diagonals of the block.  The half square triangles are placed so that they form the two brown shapes in the middle and the overall diamond shape within the block.  Check the photo carefully to make sure that you have the squares placed correctly before you sew them all together.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the ozark trail quilt block.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Clays Choice Quilt Pattern

Clays choice quilt

  My Clays Choice quilt is loosely based on the block of the same name, but I played around with the colour placements in order to create the design that I wanted, so the actual block that I ended up using probably goes by a different … [Continue reading]

Shelf Liner Ideas

Shelf liner ideas

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Peony Forget Me Nots Quilt Block

Peony forget me nots quilt block

The Peony Forget Me Nots quilt block is one that I should have made a long time ago - it is so pretty and very simple to make.  It's classified as a four patch block and I have made it here as a 16" square. Cutting requirements for the peony forget … [Continue reading]

Pisa Cathedral Quilt Pattern

Pisa cathedral quilt

The Pisa Cathedral quilt is based on one of the floor tile designs in the cathedral which stands right next to the leaning tower.  It is an exquisite building and I could have spent hours wondering around it.  I have used the same three colours that … [Continue reading]

Machine Quilting Loops

Machine quilting loops

  I'm machine quilting loops for the next block on my machine quilting sampler.  This is such an easy design to quilt - many people call them 'e', but my loops are a bit too upright to be called 'e' I think.  This can be used as a basic … [Continue reading]

Flying Kite Quilt Block Pattern

Flying kite quilt block

  The flying kite quilt block pattern was a request - and I'm really pleased that I made it.  Thanks for the suggestion, Ella.  It's a really eyecatching block and also a happy and colourful way of using up scraps.  It's not as … [Continue reading]

Florence Floor Tile Quilt Pattern One

Florence floor tile quilt one

  This is my first Florence floor tile quilt pattern - probably one of many to come.  I have chosen a very simple geometric design from the tiles in the Florence Cathedral - partly because I didn't have much time, but also because it's … [Continue reading]

Florence Quilt Design Ideas

Sunset over the River Arno

My Florence quilt design ideas will keep me going for many months!  My trip to Florence was a wonderful break - what a beautiful city it is!  I walked miles every day but I could go back tomorrow and visit a whole new set of museums, palaces and … [Continue reading]

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