Rose Mosaic Quilt Block

Rose mosaic quilt block

Rose mosaic quilt block

The rose mosaic quilt block is another beauty using half rectangle triangles – as well as half square triangles.  I feel that if I had used more muted colours it might have had the look of the Peace rose, one of my favourites.

I have made it here as an 18″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the rose mosaic quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  eight orange

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in red and orange, two each in red and white

3.7/8″ by 6.7/8″ rectangles:  four brown, four white




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the rose mosaic quilt block

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units.  You need these in red/orange and in red/white.

Make half rectangle triangles

Make half rectangle triangles

You will also need half rectangle triangles for this block.  Cut the rectangles along one diagonal to create two triangles..  Match up each brown triangle with a white triangle to re form a rectangle.  Sew the two triangles together to form a half rectangle triangle unit.

First stage of layout

First stage of layout

The first stage of the layout is shown on its own for clarity.  There are five four patch units – one in the middle and one in each corner.  There are four red/white half square triangles in the middle.  In each corner there are two orange squares with two red/orange half square triangles.

The corner square itself is an orange square and the half square triangles are placed either side of this to give the shape of a red butterfly straddling the corner.

Rose mosaic quilt block layout

Rose mosaic quilt block layout

The half rectangle triangle units are now added in pairs along each edge of the central square.  They are placed so that the two white triangles combine to form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.

Sew together in sections

Sew together in sections

Sew the half rectangle triangles into pairs and sew the squares of the four patch units together.  You will now have three rows of three squares.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the rose mosaic quilt block.

Rose mosaic quilt image

Rose mosaic quilt image

For a quilt idea I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.

To me, this definitely gives the feel of a mosaic.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Mountain Homespun Quilt

Mountain homespun quilt

Mountain homespun quilt

The Mountain Homespun quilt is a very big block and I have made this quilt using just one block and several borders. The block is actually classified as a twenty four patch, which is quite unusual.

The quilt measures 51″ square and I have used 3/4 yard each of blue and brown with 1.1/2 yards of white fabric. As usual, you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer – but hurry as I only have enough fabric for three kits.

For the blue and brown fabrics I have used two rather lovely fabrics from Fabric Freedom’s Geometrix range.  The white is not actually white, but needs to be a light fabric – I have used a Tonal Vineyard cream colour.




Mountain homespun quilt block

Mountain homespun quilt block

Cutting requirements for the mountain homespun quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty blue, sixteen white

9.1/2″ squares:  one white

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight white

1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  four white, eight brown – but read the pattern before you cut these as they can be most easily made by sewing strips of fabric together

For borders one and three you will need eight 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric cut across the width of fabric

For border two:  fifty two 3.1/2″ squares in blue and in brown – again these can be made with strip piecing

Sew three strips together

Sew three strips together

Making the mountain homespun quilt block

I have made the rectangle of 1.1/2″ strips by sewing together 1.1/2″ strips of brown, white, brown and then cutting this panel at 9.1/2″ intervals.  You need four of these rectangles.

I find that this is a more simple method than sewing together 9.1/2″ strips of the three fabrics individually.

Partial layout for the mountain homespun quilt block

Partial layout for the mountain homespun quilt block

I’ve shown the first part of the layout separately here so that you can see what a simple block this is.  There is a 9.1/2″ white square in the middle.  On each edge of this square there are three rectangles:  one white, one made with three strips and then another white.  As you can see, this just leaves the space for four corner blocks.

Full layout

Full layout

The corner blocks are nine patch units made with blue and white squares:  five blue and four white.

Sew the nine patch units first

Sew the nine patch units first

Sew together the squares within each nine patch unit and sew together the three rectangles on each edge of the central square.  You will then have nine blocks arranged in three rows of three and you can sew the blocks together across each row.   Sew the rows to each other to complete the mountain homespun quilt block.

Add the first border

Add the first border

Adding the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 27.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used alternating 3.1/2″ squares of blue and brown.

Sew blue and brown strips together

Sew blue and brown strips together

These are most easily made by sewing together 3.1/2″ strips of blue and brown.  Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles.  You’ll need to do this with five strips each of blue and brown.

Sew the rectangles into strips

Sew the rectangles into strips

Sew these rectangles together with blue and brown squares alternating.  Make two lengths of eleven rectangles and two lengths of fifteen rectangles.  Sew the smaller strips to the top and bottom of the quilt and the longer strips to the sides.

Make sure that the squares continue to alternate around the corners.

Third quilt border

Third quilt border

For the third border I have returned to the 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the mountain homespun quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I’ve been sent some details by the Quilter’s Guild for a really interesting event that will be taking place during the Festival of Quilts in Birmingham in August this year.  It sounds like great fun.  I am considering entering a team in the Game of Quitls, so I’m looking for up to five quilters to join me.  You don’t need to be an experienced quilter – just an enthusiastic one.  Please email me if you are interested.

Here’s the information about the Game of Quilts:

Game of Quilts is all about teams completing a quilt from the first cut to the last stitch on the label during the 7 hours that the Festival of Quilts is open each day.

You have complete freedom over your designs but you will be given a set block to include in the quilt.  Any style, technique and material (child-safe).  The organisers supply equipment and wadding.  This is not a competition and there is no knock-out of teams.  All are winners in that you will achieve something very special in aid of a very special cause. The quilts will be handed to Project Linus at the end of the Festival to be given to children in The Birmingham Children’s Hospital.  Most of all it’s FUN!  Free tickets for each person entering.  Get together a team of six and take it in turns to be on the stand and see the rest of the show!

For more information see the website http://gameofquilts.wix.com/gameofquilts

or contact   Hilary:   hilary.gooding@sky.com  or Jan:   allston.towers@btinternet.com   (or me!).

Craftsy

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