Geometric Quilt – Free Pattern

Geometric quilt

Geometric quilt

The geometric  quilt is completely different from my norm – both the design and the colour choices.  A long time ago I saw a modern quilt in black, grey and yellow and I thought then how well those colours went together.  For this quilt I needed a fourth colour so I added red as one that would go well with the other three fabrics.  I can see this quilt being a great choice for a student – or a man.

The quilt measures 58″ square, using nine 18″ square quilt blocks.  I have used 1/2 yard of yellow fabric, 3/4 yard each of red and black with 2 yards of grey fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the geometric quilt

Completed geometric quilt block

Completed geometric quilt block

1.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips:  seventy two red, one hundred and forty four grey – but see below for how these can be strip pieced

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips:  thirty six yellow, seventy two grey – these can also be strip pieced

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six red, thirty six grey

2.1/2″ squares:  twenty seven black, eighteen grey

2.7/8″ squares:  eighteen black, eighteen grey

For the border you will need six 2.1/2″ strips of black fabric cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangles

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a black and a grey square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the black and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the larger striped unit

Make the larger striped unit

Make the striped units

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of grey, yellow, grey to make one long panel which is 6.1/2″ wide.  Press and cut this panel at 6.1/2″ intervals to make squares.  You need thirty six of these.

Make the small striped units

Make the small striped units

Sew together 1.1/2″ strips of grey, red, grey to make one long panel which is 3.1/2″ wide.  Press and cut this panel at 3.1/2″ intervals to make squares.  You need seventy two of these.

Lay out the geometric quilt block

Layout for the central area

Layout for the central area

The central area of this block is a nine patch unit made using three black squares, two grey squares and four half square triangle units.  The black squares follow one diagonal, with the two grey squares in the remaining two corners.  The half square triangles fill the rest of the spaces, placed so that the black triangles form the large black diagonal.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Place the large striped units

Place the large striped units

On each edge of this central square place a large striped unit.  Note that two of these are placed with the stripes horizontal while in the other two the stripes are vertical.  Overall, the yellow strips form a partial square around the central square.

Geometric quilt block layout

Geometric quilt block layout

Now add the corner units.  Two of these are made with two red 3.1/2″ squares and two small striped units.  The other two corners are made with two grey squares and two small striped units.  The red squares follow the top left to bottom right diagonal while the grey squares follow the bottom left to top right diagonal.  The small striped units are placed with one horizontal and one vertical in each corner, so that the red stripes appear to surround the corner square.

Complete the quilt block

Sew the corner units first

Sew the corner units first

Sew together the units within each corner unit first: sew the pieces together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  When the corner units are complete, you’ll see that the patches are now all the same size (6.1/2″ square) and can be sewn together in three rows of three.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make nine of these.

Assemble the geometric quilt

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

The blocks are sewn together in three rows of three.

Rows 1 and 3 are the same as each other.  The easiest way to see how to rotate the blocks is to concentrate on the black shapes in the middle of the block.  These are rotated to form a zigzag, with the black beginning in the top left in the first block, then going up to the top right and then back down to bottom right in the third block.

In row 2 the zigzag is in the opposite direction, beginning at bottom left and going up to top right, then down to bottom right and finally up to top right in the third block.

Sew the blocks to each other across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border  I have used 2.1/2″ strips of black.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the geometric quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Barber Institute of Fine Art

Barber Institute of Fine Art

Have you ever driven by somewhere frequently and thought ‘I must visit that some time’?  I was like that with the Barber Institute of Fine Art and I finally got round to visiting it last week.  It’s part of the University so it’s not in the city centre, but it really was a delight to visit.  Definitely somewhere to return to when it’s raining and I want to be indoors rather than outdoors.




Bolster Cushion Cover – Free Pattern

Bolster cushion cover

Bolster cushion cover

This bolster cushion cover makes a change from the normal square cushion covers – and it really didn’t take long to make.  I’ve made it to match the quilt that I made for my future grand daughter’s cot.

Cutting requirements for the bolster cushion cover

I used one rectangle, two circles and a zip.  See below for what measurements you need.  Zigzag the edges of the fabric to prevent fraying.




Making the bolster cushion cover

Measure the circumference

Measure the circumference

You need to take three measurements before you can begin making this project:  the circumference of the cushion pad that you are using.  In my case this was 19″.  I added 2″ to this measurement for the seam allowance, so my rectangle will be 21″ long.

Measure the width

Measure the width

The second thing to measure is the width of the cushion pad.  This was 16″.  For this I only need to add 1/2″ for seam allowances, so my rectangle will be 21″ by 16.1/2″.  You can also judge the zip length that you need from this measurement – I am using a 14″ zip, just a bit shorter than the width of the bolster cushion cover.

Measure the height

Measure the height

The only other measurement that you need is the height of the cushion pad.  For this cushion pad the measurement is 6″.  I’ve added an inch to this to allow a fairly generous seam allowance.

Cut circles for the ends

Cut circles for the ends

I’ve cut two circles of 7″ diameter – that’s the length across the circle from edge to edge through the middle of the circle.  I fussy cut these so that I would have a complete panda in each circle.

Add the zip

Mark the seam allowance

Mark the seam allowance

Fold the rectangle in half with right sides together.  Mark a line 1″ from the edge of the fabric.  Place your zip along this line and make a mark at each end, just inside the main zip – you know, the bit where the actual zip begins and ends as opposed to the total length of the zip.

Sew the top seam to create a tube

Sew the top seam to create a tube

With your sewing machine, sew along the 1″ line from the side of the fabric to the zip marker on each side.  Baste the section across the middle between the two markers.  This creates a tube.  Press the seam allowance flat.

Sew the zip in place

Sew the zip in place

Turn the tube right side out and lay the zip on the inside along the seam line.  Pin and baste.  Using your zipper foot, sew each side of the zip in place.  This sounds simple but is actually a bit fiddly – be very careful to catch only the layer that you’re working on and not the other side of the tube.  This means that you have to scrunch the tube up a bit while you’re sewing in order to keep the bottom of the tube away from the needle.

Sew the circles in place

Sew the circles in place

Add the ends to the bolster cushion cover

Remove the basting along the zip and undo the zip at least part way.  This is essential because otherwise you won’t be able to turn the bolster cushion cover right side out after you’ve sewn the ends in place.

With the tube turned wrong side out, place one of the circles at one end of the tube, right sides together.  Carefully sew in place.  This just involves sewing slowly so that you can ease the two edges of fabric together as you go.  Repeat with the other circle at the other end of the tube.

Turn the cushion cover right side out (through the zip opening!) and insert cushion pad.  One bolster cushion cover made in a very short space of time.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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