Peg Bag Pattern – Free Bag Tutorial

Peg bag pattern

Peg bag pattern

This peg bag pattern is easy to make and I feel that it is another project for those who wish to craft for charity or Christmas stalls.  Or to make for yourself, of course!  It can be used as a peg bag for hanging out your washing or it can be hung from a hanger to hold your socks or tights.  The bag is very approximately 11″ wide by 11″ long.

I’ve seen peg bags with applique washing lines and clothes on them, but I have gone for a much simpler strip of lace around the neckline.  It is intended to look like a small dress – but with a very large neckline so that you can easily pull out pegs or socks from within the bag.  Lace is also a great way of covering imperfections in the neckline!

To buy the kit click on peg bag kit.




Cutting requirements for the peg bag pattern

I have used a 13″ strip cut across the width of fabric for the outer fabric and the lining fabric.  In addition you will need about 28″ of lace.  Cut one of each template in outer fabric and one of each in the lining fabric.  You will also need two strips about 1″ by 9″ in the lining fabric for the tapes.

Click here for the peg bag front template

Click here for the peg bag back template

Pin the template to the fabric

Pin the template to the fabric

Cut the fabric

Lay your strip of fabric out across the length and fold back about 13″ at the end so that you have two layers of fabric for that 13″ stretch.  Pin one of the templates in place with the right hand edge of the template lined up with the fold in the fabric.

Cut one in the outer fabric (the sky fabric) and one in the lining fabric (Liberty Art fabric).

Make a new fold for the 2nd template

Make a new fold for the 2nd template

Fold the strip of fabric over by 13″ again to create a new fold and pin the other template to it, again matching the right hand edge of the template with the fold line.

From the scraps of the lining fabric cut two strips about 1″ by 9″ for the tapes.

Sew the outer front and back together

Sew the outer front and back together

Assemble the peg bag

Place the two sections of outer fabric (back and front of bag) with right sides together.  Sew from the edge of the neckline across the shoulder, down each side, across the bottom and up the other side.  This creates a pouch.

Repeat with the lining fabric but this time sew across the shoulders and down the sides only – do not sew across the bottom of the bag lining.  This creates a tube.

Clip into the seams

Clip into the seams

Clip the corners where the fabric sticks out and clip into the seam on the inward curve of the seams.

This will help to make the bag lie flat when you turn the sections right side out.

Turn the outer bag right side out but leave the lining bag wrong side out.

Make the tape

Make the tape

Sew the two tapes

Lay the strips for the tapes with right side down.  Fold the edges in to the middle along the length.  Then fold the strip in half along the length so that the raw edges are completely concealed.  Sew along the strip to hold in place.  One end of each tape will be concealed within the seams.  I usually tie a simple knot in the other end to prevent fraying.

Pin the tapes in place

Pin the tapes in place

Lay the tapes on the neckline of the lining fabric about 2″ either side of the central point.  One end of each tape will lie on the neckline while the other end lies down the back of the section.

Pull the lining over the outer bag

Pull the lining over the outer bag

Join the two sections of the peg bag pattern

Pull the bag lining down over the top of the outer section, matching the neckline particularly.  The tapes are now lying between the two bag sections.

Sew around the complete neckline so that the two bag sections are joined together.  I found the two shoulder sections a bit fiddly to sew – just where the back and front pieces are joined.  You need to sew these bits slowly so that you can ease the fabric as you go.  Don’t forget that the lace will cover the occasional bump in the fabric – although I’m sure that you are a more careful sewer than I am so you won’t have any bumps!

Pull the lining up

Pull the lining up

Pull the lining bag up over the top of the bag sections so that you can sew the hemline of this section.

Sew the hemline

Sew the hemline

Turn under the two edges to make a small seam along the hemline and sew this in place.

Push the lining back inside the outer bag, pushing into the corners of the sleeves and hemlines to make a good fit.

Topstitch the neckline

Topstitch the neckline

Pin around the neckline and sew a line of topstitching to keep the two layers in place.

Sew lace around the neckline

Sew lace around the neckline

Add the lace

That’s the peg bag pattern complete apart from the embellishment.  For this I have used lace for three reasons:  it looks like clouds on the sky fabric, looks like a pretty collar on the dress shape and hides any imperfections in the neckline.

The lace is sewn on by hand.  I began at the back of the neckline to hide the join of the two ends, although in fact the lace is easy enough to join so the join doesn’t really show up anyway.

Peg bag on the line

Peg bag on the line

You can see the peg bag pattern in action here with the tapes used to tie it to the washing line.

I hope that you’ll find this a useful pattern whether you make it for yourself or for your charity sewing.

Here’s the video:

Portmeirion village

Portmeirion village

Last week I promised you a little more on my Welsh trip.  One of the highlights of the trip was a look around Portmeirion.  This is an extraordinary village built on a peninsular in North Wales.

The architect, Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, wanted to show that beautiful buildings could be built to highlight the natural landscape.  He was heavily influenced by Italian architecture and the result is a gorgeous village – although I wouldn’t want to live there and have to cope with all the hordes of tourists!

The Prisoner

The Prisoner

The village has been used in countless films and TV programmes.  Perhaps the most famous of these was The Prisoner, filmed in the 1960’s.  You can get the feeling of this looking through the bars on to the river.

 

Making Pillowcases – Sewing Projects

Making pillowcases

Making pillowcases

Making pillowcases is incredibly quick and simple to do.  I don’t suppose that this project took me more than an hour.  It’s a great way to make pillowcases to tone in with your bedroom or to give as a gift.  Made in a plain fabric with some embroidery , they make lovely personalised gifts.

Cutting requirements for making pillowcases

I based my measurements on an existing pillowcase and cut two lengths of fabric – one 19″ by 30″ and one 19″ by 36″.  I used two different fabrics so that you could see more clearly what I did.  The pillowcase also now matches the duvet cover that I made a few weeks ago.




Overlocking on the edges

Overlocking on the edges

Making pillowcases

I began by serging round all four edges of each rectangle to seal the edges.  Hindsight being a wonderful thing, I realised afterwards that I should have left this to the end and then I could have serged two edges together.  Basically I’m so thrilled to have my serger working that I serge anything that sits still for long enough.

The story behind this is that I bought my serger machine a few years ago for £100 at Aldi.  I was busy at the time but just felt that it was a really good buy, so I didn’t actually try to use it for some months.  Then I went to a workshop to find out what I could do with the machine.  I found that there was a screw missing on the plate so the feed didn’t work and I basically couldn’t do any sewing with it.  All I really learned was how to thread all the different threads.

Fast forward some considerable time and I managed to find a small screw that would work, fired up the machine and am absolutely thrilled with it.  I wish that I had sorted it out ages ago.

One panel longer than the other

One panel longer than the other

Anyway, back to making pillowcases …  I turned under a small double hem on one short edge of each panel of fabric and sewed the hem in place.  Then I lined up the two rectangles, right sides together, so that the bottom edges of the two were in line with each other.  At the other end, where I had hemmed the edges, the blue rectangle was about 6″ longer than the red one.

Fold the blue rectangle

Fold the blue rectangle

I folded the blue rectangle down so that the fold was in line with the edge of the red rectangle.

Then I sewed the two long edges and the bottom short edge.  This creates a pouch.  Turn the pillowcase right side out and insert a pillow.  The folded blue fabric acts as an envelope so that you can tuck the pillow in to keep it in the pillowcase.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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