Nine Patch Star Quilt Pattern

 

Nine patch star quilt

Nine patch star quilt

For the nine patch star quilt I have used a nine patch formation within one of the blocks and then again within the quilt itself.  The quilt blocks are all 16″ square finished size and the quilt measures 56″ square.  I have used 3/4 yard of blue fabric, 1.1/4 yards of red and 1.3/4 yards of white.

Nine patch star and pinwheel quilt blocks

Nine patch star and pinwheel quilt blocks

I have used nine patch star quilt blocks and pinwheel quilt blocks.  Isn’t it fascinating how the pinwheels look so much larger than the nine patch star when you see them individually like this?

Cutting requirements for the nine patch star quilt

8.7/8″ squares:  four blue, four red, eight white

4.1/2″ squares:  twenty five red

2.7/8″ squares:  twenty blue, twenty white

2.7/8″ by 4.7/8″ rectangles:  twenty blue, twenty white

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty white

2.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty white

For the borders you will need five 2.1/2″ white strips and six 2.1/2″ red strips cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the pinwheel quilt blocks

Make half square triangles with the 8.7/8″ squares.  Place a white square right sides together with either a blue or a red square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 8.1/2″ squares.

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Lay the half square triangles out in fours, rotating them to give the pinwheel formation as shown.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other to complete the pinwheel block.

You will need two red and two blue pinwheel blocks.

Make half rectangle triangles

Make half rectangle triangles

Making the nine patch star quilt block

Make half square triangles as above with the blue and white 2.7/8″ squares.  For this block you will also need half rectangle triangles.  Cut the 2.7/8″ by 4.7/8″ rectangles along one diagonal, making sure that you cut them in pairs with wrong sides together – this is how fabric is normally folded when you buy it.  This way you will get two mirror image half rectangle triangle units.

Place a blue and a white triangle together to form a rectangle again, as shown on the top right of the photo.  Lay the two triangles right sides together and sew together.  You will get the best results if you have the smallest (narrowest) tip of the blue triangle sticking out 1/4″ above the white triangle, and the smallest tip of the white triangle sticking out 1/4″ beyond the blue triangle.  Press the seam allowance towards the blue and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Nine patch star quilt block layout

Nine patch star quilt block layout

The central part of the nine patch star quilt block is unsurprisingly a nine patch formation.  It is easiest to make this first and then add the outer frame of the block afterwards.

Lay the squares out in three rows as shown with a red square at each corner and in the middle.  Place the half rectangle triangle units in pairs in the middle of each edge, with the blue triangles together forming a larger blue triangle pointing in towards the middle of the block.

Sew the pairs of half rectangle triangles together

Sew the pairs of half rectangle triangles together

Sew the pairs of half rectangle triangles together first.  Now all the squares are the same size as each other and can be sewn together across each row.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the nine patch star quilt block central area.

Full layout for the nine patch star quilt block

Full layout for the nine patch star quilt block

Now the outer frame can be added.  Across the top and bottom there are two half square triangle units with a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ white rectangle on either side.  Down each side there are two half square triangle units with a 6.1/2″ white rectangle above and below them.

Sew the top and bottom strips in place

Sew the top and bottom strips in place

Sew the parts of the four strips together first and then sew them to the central nine patch quilt block formation.  Sew the top and bottom strips first and then add the sides.

You will need to make five of the nine patch star quilt blocks.

First and third rows of the nine patch star quilt

First and third rows of the nine patch star quilt

Assembling the nine patch star quilt

The blocks are sewn together in three rows of three.  The first and third rows are made with a nine patch star quilt block at each end and a blue pinwheel quilt block in the middle.

Second row of the nine patch star quilt

Second row of the nine patch star quilt

The second row is made with a red pinwheel quilt block at each end and a nine patch star quilt block in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Adding the quilt borders

I had intended to add a simple red frame to the quilt, but I felt that some of the design was lost when I tried it out, so I added a white border first to give some separation between the quilt blocks and the border.  Both the borders are made using 2.1/2″ strips of fabric.

For the white border you’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

For the red border you’ll need two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the nine patch star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

What a wonderful week it’s been here in the UK.  Record temperatures and plenty of sunshine.  I always feel cheerful and energised with sunshine, so I’ve been able to get plenty done!

Craftsy

Making Wedding Ring Pillows

 

Making wedding ring pillows

Making wedding ring pillows

I wanted to make a wedding ring pillow for my son’s wedding but I couldn’t make my mind up on which embroidery to use, so I’ve made two and I’ll let Katy make the decision.  I was playing with Matilda, my embroidery machine, and came across two embroidery designs that I liked – one of two hearts entwined and another with two wedding bells beneath two doves pulling the ends of the ribbons.  The bells had been my first choice but then I wondered if that design was too complex and perhaps the hearts would make a better wedding ring cushion.  Oh if only I could make my mind up to more decisive!

Making wedding ring pillows

I began with two 7″ squares in each colour – one for the front and one for the back in each colour.  I’ve used silk for both of them, but you could use any fabric that fitted with the colour scheme for the wedding.  I backed one square in each colour with an interfacing so that the embroidery would lie flat.  Rather than tearing away the excess interfacing after I’d completed the embroidery, I left the entire square in place to give some body to the front of the wedding ring cushion.

Sew three sides only to make a pouch

Sew three sides only to make a pouch

Make a pouch

When I was happy with the embroidery I placed the two squares with right sides together and sewed around three sides to form a pouch.  I should really have used a ball point needle because I’m using silk, but I forgot and luckily I didn’t end up with holes everywhere.

Fill the wedding ring pillows

Fill the wedding ring pillows

Fill the wedding ring cushions

For the filling I just used the same stuffing that I use for toys, but you could use wadding or fabric cut into small pieces if you prefer.  Try to put enough stuffing to make the wedding ring pillow full without making it feel too rigid.

Sew the fourth side closed

Sew the fourth side closed

Turn under a small seam across the fourth edge of the square and hand sew across the seam to close the gap.  I had hoped to run a line of embroidery round the edge of the wedding ring cushion but I ended up with the edges looking uneven, so I think that it would only work with hand embroidery where you can adjust the fabric as you sew.

Add some ribbon for the rings

Add some ribbon for the rings

Add ribbon to hold the rings

Now for the important part – attaching the wedding rings.  I cut a 12″ length of ribbon and sewed it to a point of the cushion about half way across and in the middle of the space between the embroidery and the top of the wedding ring pillow.

Tie the rings on with ribbon

Tie the rings on with ribbon

You can then thread one ring to each side of ribbon and tie a bow to hold them in place until they are needed.  My middle son is best man for the wedding, so I hope this should enable him to keep the rings safe!  Perhaps it had better be a double bow.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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