Large Daisy Quilt Block Pattern

Large daisy quilt block

Large daisy quilt block

The Large Daisy quilt block probably has several names, but I couldn’t find any so I have named it myself.  It really does look like a bright and cheerful daisy to me.  It is classified as an eight patch block, which is not as common as four or nine patch blocks.  I have made it here as a 24″ square so I won’t have too much to add to it to make a small Linus quilt.

Cutting requirements for the large daisy quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty red, sixteen white

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  eight red, eight white




 

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use all the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the large daisy quilt block

Layout for each quarter

Layout for each quarter

I found it most simple to make this block in quarters and then just sew the quarters together.  Lay the squares out in four rows of four squares.

The first row contains a red, white then red square with a half square triangle at the end.

Row two is made with white, red, white squares followed by a half square triangle.

For the third row you need only one red square and one white rectangle.

Finally the fourth row is made with two half square triangles followed by a white and a red square.

Completed quarter block

Completed quarter block

Note that the two red triangles at the top form a larger red triangle pointing to the left while the two red triangles at the bottom form a larger red triangle pointing upwards.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quarter block.  This measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

Large daisy quilt block layout

Large daisy quilt block layout

Assemble the large daisy quilt block

Rotate the quarter blocks so that there is a red square in each corner and those three red squares form a diagonal across each corner.  Check that the pairs of red triangles now combine to form diamonds and that there are four red squares in the middle.

Sew the quarters together in two pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

Basic large daisy quilt

Basic large daisy quilt

Large daisy quilt design ideas

For the basic quilt suggestion I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.  I have added a green border and this makes a bright and cheerful quilt.

Alternate design

Alternate design

However I felt that it might look better if the blocks were separated a little so that they showed the block design more.  I added green sashing (leaves?) and I like this quilt design better.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Floating Diamond Quilt – Free Pattern

Floating diamond quilt

Floating diamond quilt

In the Floating Diamond quilt I have used the sashed four patch quilt block as an alternative.  Both are very easy blocks and I think they go well together.  I rather like all the secondary designs that form within the quilt.

The blocks are 12″ square finished size and I have made eight floating diamond blocks and eight sashed four patch blocks.

The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used 1 yard of lilac fabric, 1.1/4 yards of purple and 1.1/2 yards of green fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the floating diamond quilt

For the floating diamond quilt blocks:

3.1/2″ squares:  forty eight purple, sixteen lilac

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in lilac and green

For the sashed four patch block:

4.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen lilac

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen lilac

8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two purple

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ green strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a lilac and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Floating diamond quilt block layout

Floating diamond quilt block layout

Make the floating diamond quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows of four.

Place a 3.1/2″ purple square in each corner with a lilac/purple four patch unit in the middle.  Fill the remaining spaces with half square triangles.  Lay these so that the green triangles together form larger green triangles pointing away from the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Sashed 4 patch quilt block layout

Sashed 4 patch quilt block layout

Make the sashed four patch quilt block

This block is even more easy to make!  Once again place a four patch in the middle but this time use lilac and green 4.1/2″ squares.  Use 2.1/2″ squares in the corners.  Place two green corners to follow one diagonal and two lilac corners to follow the other diagonal.

Fill the remaining spaces with purple rectangles.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the pieces together in the top and bottom rows.  For the middle section you need to sew the four patch unit together first and then you can sew a purple rectangle to each side.

Sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make eight of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the floating diamond quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four blocks.  In row one use a floating diamond at each end with two sashed 4 patch blocks in the middle.  Note the directions of the diagonals:  the green squares in the middle two blocks begin in the middle and move towards the side.  In the floating diamond blocks the purple squares begin in the corners and move towards the middle.

Row two

Row two

For row two you need two floating diamond blocks in the middle with a sashed 4 patch block at each end.  The squares in the diagonals continue the lines begun in the first row.

Row three

Row three

Row three also contains two floating diamonds in the middle with a sashed 4 patch at each end.  Now the green diagonals are moving from the sides towards the middle and the purple diagonals are moving from the middle towards the edges.

Row four

Row four

Finally in row four place two sashed four patch blocks in the middle with a floating diamond at each end.  The diagonals continue in the same directions as they did in row three.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the quilt border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the floating diamond quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

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