Shoulder Bag Pattern – All Machine Sewn

Shoulder bag pattern

Shoulder bag pattern

I like my shoulder bag pattern – it’s going to be really useful when I’m travelling.  The only hand sewing I used was for the fastener.  The shoulder bag has two compartments and a long strap to go on the shoulder or across the body.  The body of the bag measures about 9″ wide by 8″ high and it is fully lined.

Cutting requirements for the shoulder bag pattern

Blue fabric:  one 9″ strip cut across the width of fabric, one 2″ strip cut across the width of fabric

Gold fabric:  one 9″ strip cut across the width of fabric

Wadding:  one rectangle 8″ by 9″, one rectangle 8″ by 20″

Fastener:  I used a pressed stud with a button for decoration.




Mark curves at one end

Mark curves at one end

Layer the fabrics

Lay the two strips of fabric with right sides together.  Make a mark at 8″ intervals along the length of the fabrics.  Mark curves in one end using a plate or something similar.  Cut along the curves.

You should now have one end straight and one end curved.

Lay wadding at the two ends

Lay wadding at the two ends

Lay the first (8″) rectangle of wadding on the straight end of the fabrics – to the right in the photo.  Place the second (20″) rectangle at the curved end.  One end of the larger wadding should be in line with the third 8″ marker while the other end should overlap the curved end.  You will have a 16″ gap with no wadding, only fabric.

Cut a curve in the wadding

Cut a curve in the wadding

Cut a curve on the wadding to match the curve in the fabrics.

Press strip in half along the length

Press strip in half along the length

Make the shoulder bag strap

Fold the 2″ blue strip of fabric along the middle lengthways.  Press.  Fold under a 1/4″ hem along one raw edge and press.

Top stitch on both sides

Top stitch on both sides

Usually I try and fold under the two raw edges at the same time, but I realised that it made much more sense to press one edge under first.  Then it’s much more easy to fold the other edge under to match the one that’s already pressed.

Top stitch 1/4″ in from the edge to hold the layers together.  Top stitch again 1/4″ from the other edge.  This gives extra strength to the strap and also looks neater.

Pin the strap to the gold fabric

Pin the strap to the gold fabric

Add the strap to the shoulder bag

Working at the curved end of the fabrics, fold back the wadding and the blue fabric.  Place one end of the strap on each side, making sure that the strap isn’t twisted.  Lay them so that they are on the fourth 8″ marker, making them about 8″ from the curved end.

Now tuck the rest of the strap down between the blue and gold fabrics (away from the edges) and fold the blue fabric and wadding back into place.

In the past I have always hand sewn the strap in place after I’ve finished the rest of the bag.  It was never very neat, so sewing the strap to the bag during the construction was one of the things that I wanted to achieve.  Luckily it worked!

Sew the layers together

Clip the curve

Clip the curve

Beginning somewhere in the middle, sew a seam about 1/4″ from the edge all round the fabrics.  This secures the three layers together.  Leave a gap of about 6″ so that you can turn the project right side out.  I usually leave this somewhere in the middle where there is no wadding – it makes it more easy to turn the project out.

Trim the seam allowance and clip in towards the stitching around the curve.  This gives a more even curve for the front of the shoulder bag.

Turn the shoulder bag right side out through the gap.  Pin the edges to make sure that the seam lies along the edge and press.  At this stage turn under small hems across the gap.  Top stitch all round the edge of the bag.  This closes the gap so there’s no hand sewing required there – another stage that I could never manage neatly.

Form the first pouch

Form the first pouch

Fold the sections of the shoulder bag pattern

Begin at the straight end of the bag.  Pull the end of the bag up to the second 8″ marker, so that the fold is at the first 8″ marker.  You may need to put pins in to re mark the sections if like me you had made your original marks on the wrong side of the fabric.  This forms the first compartment of the bag.

Make the second compartment

Make the second compartment

Now take the top of that first compartment (both layers) and pull it up to the fourth 8″ marker – about 8″ from the curved end.  This forms the second compartment behind the first one.  The top of the compartments should now be level with the strap.

Sew the sides of the compartments

Embroidery for the sides

Embroidery for the sides

I have always found sewing the sides of the compartments together a pain because there was too much fabric for me to be able to use my machine.  That’s why I designed this shoulder bag pattern so that there is wadding at the front and the back of the bag, but none in the two layers between.  I bet you were wondering why there was that area with no wadding on the fabric!

Because of the reduced thickness, I was able to use my machine to sew the sides together and I used one of the embroidery stitches.  I used a stem stitch which turned out really well.

Button just for show

Button just for show

That’s pretty much it now.  For a fastening I used a pressed stud to secure the front flap of the bag.  Then I added a button on the front of the flap just for show.  I’m sure that you will be far more creative in your embellishments.

Modelling the bag

Modelling the bag

I am ridiculously pleased with my should bag pattern.  It took no time to make because it was all machine sewn.  It’s sturdy and practical.  I think that it will be great for when I’m travelling – I can keep my passport and tickets secure by my body.  Or I could make several and match them to outfits.

Here’s the video:

Sherlock Holmes statue

Sherlock Holmes statue

I was in London last week and I was reminded of how much history there is around every corner.  I needed to walk to Baker Street station and outside there was a lovely big statue of Sherlock Holmes.  All the shops and pubs in the area seemed to be named after him as well.

MCC

MCC

On the way there, just round the corner from Marylebone station, I happened upon a square which was the original home of the Marylebone cricket club – now known as the MCC.  There were various plaques around the square detailing the history.  Both my sons play cricket so it was fascinating to see this cricketing history.

Salem Quilt Block – Free Pattern

Salem quilt block

Salem quilt block

I love the Salem quilt block – such a pretty block and really very easy to make.  It’s classified as a nine patch block and I’ve made it here as an 18″ square finished size.  I was curious as to the history of the block but couldn’t find any information about it.

Cutting requirements for the Salem quilt block

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in blue and white, ten each in purple and white

3.1/2″ squares:  eight white




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle

Make half square triangles

Use all the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a white square right sides together with either  a blue or a purple square.  Mark a line along one diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.

Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances away from the white and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Corner four patch units

Corner four patch units

Make the Salem quilt block

This block is best constructed as a series of four patch units.

Make the unit for the corners with two white squares and two blue/white half square triangle units.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs together.  This is now a 6.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Central block

Central block

Make the central unit with four purple/white half square triangles.  Place them so that the white triangles are all in the middle, forming a white diamond.

Once again sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  You need to make just one of this unit.

Remaining 4 patch unit

Remaining 4 patch unit

The remaining four patch units are also made with four purple/white half square triangles

This time place them so that the top two form a larger white triangle pointing down while the bottom two form a larger purple triangle pointing down.  Make four of this unit.

Salem quilt block layout

Salem quilt block layout

Assemble the Salem quilt block

Lay the units out in three rows of three.  Place blue/white units in each corner, the white diamond in the middle and the other purple/white units on each edge of the central unit.  Note that the purple V shape always points towards the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic Salem quilt suggestion

Basic Salem quilt suggestion

Quilt suggestions

For the basic quilt suggestion I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

This makes an interesting quilt – I like the way the blue border blends with the blue triangles around the edge.

Alternative quilt suggestion

Alternative quilt suggestion

As an alternative, I reversed the colours in four of the blocks.  This gives a similar quilt but I felt that this was a more interesting design.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

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